Underdogs Advantages And Disadvantages Analysis

Decent Essays
Samantha Strauss
Mrs. Dodd
AP Language
18 September 2017
David and Goliath An underdog is defined as a member of society that is not expected to win a contest or has a social or political disadvantage. These people are sometimes looked at as hopeless or have no chance at winning, and when they do win people credit it to luck. In Malcolm Gladwell’s bestselling book David and Goliath he studies the science behind underdogs and how disadvantages can be turned into advantages. There is in fact a trend and a science behind the way underdogs are formed. Underdogs leave their mark on society and tend to be remembered throughout history. Gladwell looks for repeating trends in society and history and looks for the why behind them. He writes this novel to evaluate the meaning of an underdog, and how to think outside of the cultural norms in society. Generally, people will follow the latest trends on social media or all attempt to dress the same according to the latest style. Being an individual in today's society is almost frowned upon. If no one ever tried something new or questioned the things around them, history would not be possible. Gladwell uses people’s stories, where they are seemingly at a disadvantage, and how they adapt to it in order to impact the people around them.
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The personal rhetoric Gladwell uses alongside the facts and studies he has compiled makes the book have unique meaning to each reader. With this being his most recent installment, Gladwell has created roots and established credibility in the nonfiction genre. He backs up his credibility with studies and facts about individuals in his books. Finally, he provides emotional appeal through a variety of anecdotes and references to the reader. Together, these uses of rhetoric allow Gladwell to achieve his purpose of challenging the societal and cultural norm and explaining the reasons behind an

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