The Challenges Of Socialization In The Kite Runner By Khaled Hosseini

2538 Words 11 Pages
The Kite Runner is an honest, and touching novel written by Khaled Hosseini that takes place primarily in Kabul, Afghanistan. It is a story of two childhood friends; Amir and Hassan who are separated by the Soviet Invasion of 1979. During the invasion, Amir escapes to California where he becomes a successful writer. Fifteen years after his marriage, he receives a call to return to Kabul where he sets out on the quest to rescue Hassan’s son, Sohrab. Throughout the novel, real life events are explained and brought into detail in the Afghan society. Although the Kite Runner receives much criticism and controversy, Hosseini does a remarkable job of depicting the true culture of Afghanistan through its progression and changes from the 1960’s until …show more content…
The Afghan government is overthrown in 1973 by a bloodless coup, followed by many years of warfare continuing into today. The people of Afghanistan are innocent at first to the gunfire and loud explosions. Its new sound startles the people, including Amir and Hassan, as they hide together from the action …show more content…
Islam originated in the Middle east around Mecca, and is now the second largest religious group in the world. For the most part, Muslims share the same basic beliefs but there are different interpretations of Islam. Its teachings of Islam were once revealed to Muhammad and recorded in the Qur’an. Muslims depend on the Qur’an for everyday teachings, prayer, and guidelines. Along with the holy book, Muslims must follow the five pillars of Islam. Most importantly, Muslims are expected to “reflect on their spiritual beliefs” and “gratitude” (Muslims). Just like how Khaled Hosseini depicts Baba in the novel, he and every other man of Islam are expected to put others first and value the Muslim culture. The Kite Runner is a compelling novel filled with real life culture. Its explanations of ethnic diversity, warfare, and religion create a story that relates to what many others are suffering through in the middle east. Author Khaled Hosseini was once a young boy in Afghanistan, just as Amir and Hassan are, which creates even more of an emotional appeal. The characters in the novel are diverse and help shape the story into what it is. Because of the great amount of detail that Hosseini uses to explain Afghanistan’s history, the Kite Runner realistically shares Afghan culture and

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