The Challenges Of Millennium Development Goals In Third World Countries

1459 Words 6 Pages
When discussing the successes of development in Third World countries, subjectivity plays a key role in its determination . What a person in a First World country considers development and that of a person who lives in a Third World country will vary greatly due to their individual ideas of what constitutes development. In its planning, “poverty,” “education,” “[gender] equality,” “environmental sustainability,” among others, are listed as goals to be met (United Nations MDG Report 2014). These are called Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which were created with the intention to help Third World countries develop. Even though these issues are considered vital to the well-being of peoples in Third World countries, there are a number of issues …show more content…
Continued progress towards the MDGs in the remaining year is essential to provide a solid foundation for the post-2015 development agenda” (United Nations MDG Report 2014). Although, it is has also become routine for First World countries to seek benefits when attempting to aid countries that are underdeveloped. They also set the agendas and enforce them onto Third World nations while repeatedly ignoring significant issues that contribute or withhold proper development . As Everjoice Win explains, there are “complex realities” that people are living that outsiders cannot see or often miss to acknowledge (Win, 61). To create a starting point, this essay will deconstruct the definition of development, in terms of First World countries: “promote higher standards of living, full employment, and conditions of economic and social progress” (United Nations, About Development). Furthermore, it will analyze the insufficiency and lack of consideration of communities within Third World countries, as the creators of development agendas are ignorant of the intersectionalities that take …show more content…
Moreover, MDGs impose a political development onto Third World countries, as well. For example, the spread of neoliberalism and religious fundamentalism (from First Nation countries) become embedded in goals and policies. This further alienates Third World countries from achieving any development . There is an idea that Third World nations increase their ‘backwardness’ because they aren’t catching up with MDGs. This must be attributed to the “unequal power relations” between First and Third World countries (Win 2007). For example, the Peace Corps (among other groups) brought into focus the idea of underdeveloped countries “But none of those campaigns is comparable to what was achieved, in the same sense, by Latin America dependency theorist and other leftist intellectuals dedication to criticizing all and every one of the development strategies that the north Americans successively put into fashion” (Esteva, 2010). Everjoice Win, an African feminist who has lived experiences in a Third World country says that the “personal is political” because people have to live with the successes and failures of MDGs (Win 2007). She also mentions the double standard for feminists within First and Third World country. The former is praised on their Eurocentric and belittling ways of presenting women of Third World women, and when the latter presents her fellow women in a non-demeaning way it is

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