Mao Zedong Deng Analysis

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During the Maoist era China experienced 30 years of uninterrupted leadership by one single man, that of course became almost unquestionable by the people. But after 1976 the new challenge for Chinese leaders was to leave a footprint in the country’s history during one or two mandates. It is considered difficult for succeeding leaders to have the same cultural and political influence of Mao Zedong, and the new challenge for the elites of the Chinese Communist Party was in fact to leave a clear footprint in history during only one or two mandates as General Secretary. Thanks to this situation anyway every leader, from Deng to Xi Jinping, developed a clear, influential and overarching theory, leaving a consistent legacy to be pursued by the successors. …show more content…
In fact we can observe that Deng and Xi Jinping in particular are the two leaders that brought major changes in the political structure of China. In order to promote the revolutionary economic opening of the market Deng started to bring institutions closer to citizens, through a redefinition of election processes in villages and with the institution of the Central Advisory Commission. But the driving force of the last political reforms in China was undoubtedly corruption. In fact Hu Jintao and Xi Jinping both acknowledged that this was a fundamental problem in the country, able to waste and to destroy all the other successes that the country was accomplishing. The difference in the approach is clear: Hu Jintao tried to speak to the population in order to tackle the issue from the basis with his Eight Honors and Eight Shames, a set of moral rules that did not stimulate the public opinion as expected. But the scandal that ensnared the People’s Liberation Army just after the end of his term explains the lack of consistent policies to eradicate this problem. While on the contrary Xi Jinping, right after the 18th National Congress in 2012 implemented the Anti-Corruption Campaign: the largest organized anti-graft effort in the history of Communist rule in China. More than 100.000 people have been indicted for corruption, hitting more …show more content…
The current General Secretary of the Communist Party of China has just accomplished two fundamental goals in october 2017: the renewal of his term and a mention of its leading theory in the Chinese constitution. Talking about personal success is undoubtedly true that Xi obtained incredible results, becoming the most powerful leader together with Mao, writing his name and ideas into the party constitution ( “Xi Jinping Thought for the New Era of Socialism With Chinese Special Characteristics” ). Many commentators say that this success is also the result of the Anti-Corruption Campaign mentioned before, that probably eliminated most of the opposers of the General Secretary. But even taking this into consideration, there is not a general discontent from the population even after a strong censorship censorship of the internet in China. It results in the economic field and in the rising power that the country is assuming, after many years, thanks to the development of the People’s Liberation Army, give to Xi, especially from the party, an incontestable personal power and at the same time the possibility to implement concretely the Chinese Dream at the benefit of the whole country. Its political stature and its concrete accomplishments are the key of its success both as a politician and as the leader of

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