The Challenges Of Globalization And The Future Of East Asia

1447 Words 6 Pages
Manfred B. Steger proposes the concept of globalization to describe the interpenetration of globalism and nationalism, and in the near future, East Asia and the world’s growing economy, ecologic demand, and culinary cuisine will shift and cause the region to adapt to change and progress in its innovations, stability, and dominance. The future of the East Asian region is contingent on Steger’s concept of globalization, specifically in the multidisciplinary aspects of economy, ecology, and culinary exchange. Despite the contemporary idea that western nations assert dominance globally due to industrialization, increased military prominence, and technological innovations, East Asia’s global influence can be seen as a direct challenger in its economic …show more content…
East Asia contends with western nations that are thought to be more dominant through economics, industrialization, and technological advancement, because the East Asian region, in contemporary times, has displayed major economic and ecological growth especially in aspects of justice and reformation. Currently, the United States, and many other nations, are financially in debt to China, one of the world’s leading economic powers. China is involved with many major companies such as Apple and Foxconn, which have influences throughout the world, and plays a large part in both regional and global trading markets, syncing it with Steger’s concept of the global economic order. Aside from China’s economic influence having connections and ties with larger transnational corporations in terms of production and manufacturing, China has recently been regulating justice concerns for workers’ rights. Chan, Pun, and Selden’s article, The politics of global production: Apple, Foxconn, and China’s New Working Class, highlights recent regulations for labor forces and unions. China’s recent reform however, does not only stem in justice for workers, but also justice for the …show more content…
Rich Howarth’s journal, Sustainability, Well-being, and Economic Growth, strongly advocates that “policies that promote sustainability may well lead to (some, but not unlimited) economic growth.” Unlike most nations that depend on nonrenewable resources such as oil and coal, the East Asian nations have been progressing in their development of sustainable renewable sources of energy such as solar, wind, and hydropower, and as a result, the region’s economy has been stabilizing. Clifford Krauss’s China’s Hunger for Commodities Wanes, and Pain Spreads Among Producers, describes the global financial crisis of 2008 when the price of commodities crashed, and the global economy was ruined because China, which previously “gobbled up all manner of metals, crops and fuels as its economy rapidly expanded,” transitioned towards green energy. This is a critical example of the ties between ecology and economy because China’s shift towards eco-friendly energy negatively impacted the global economy; however, with recent development and progression in the sustainability of green energy such as wind pods and more efficient turbines in wind and hydropower, renewable energy has been

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