The Challenges Of German Americans In The 20th Century

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Lemony Snicket, an author, once said, “A new experience can be extremely pleasurable, or extremely irritating, or somewhere in between, and you never know until you try it out” (“A Quote from The Blank Book." Goodreads). German Americans also faced experiences that were both pleasurable and irritating during the span of the early to mid-1900s. Their culture suffered and they faced discrimination during WWI, but they quickly regained their respect from society in WWII. Also, the German Americans faced economic downturn during the Great Depression, but found political prosperity in support of the New Deal and the Democratic Party. However, the German Americans faced less prejudice from the US society after WWII rather than before WWI. Although …show more content…
Furthermore, German Americans still faced some discrimination from the US society as an aftermath of WWI and were not immediately accepted back into the American community. For example, in the 1920s several German breweries and pubs in the US had to shut down due to prohibition and WWI Anti-German sentiment. In fact, several German American leaders tried to reinstate German ethnic life in the US, but failed to do so because many people still harbored feelings of bitterness for German-Americans after WWI ("THREE CENTURIES OF GERMANS IN AMERICA”.). For example, the US bitterness for German Americans caused the German immigration to significantly decrease in the 1920s. Also, the Trading with the Enemy Act did not allow German Business in US to trade with Germany. Moreover, German-American business suffered because they had to shut their business down or change the Business’s name to an American name. (“German-Americans during World War I," ). On the other hand, German-Americans benefited through the 1920s and the GD because they were still the oldest and largest community in the 1920s. Many cities, like: New York, Chicago and Cleveland, consisted of mostly German-American …show more content…
Roosevelt’s New Deal. During WWI, German Americans despised FDR because he sympathized with the Allied powers (German - Shadows of War). But, in WWII they shifted their beliefs to the Democratic Party and drifted away from the Republican Party because they believed that FDR’s New Deal and its principles would help ameliorate their current conditions and the conditions of the US during the start of WWII (“German-Americans during World War I," ). Germans were not as discriminated as the Italians and Japanese because most of the German Americans had declared their loyalty to the US during the start of the war, which led to less bitterness for German Americans than in WWI (Ebel). For example, the majority of German Americans did not support the German-American Bund Group, which was a group of German Americans who supported the Nazis (Ells). Just like WWI, German Americans contributed to the war effort at both home and abroad by talking against the Nazi party in their societies and by joining the army ("THREE CENTURIES OF GERMANS IN

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