The Challenges Of Gender Inequality In Developing Countries

1260 Words 6 Pages
Over the past couple of weeks, we looked at many different articles and studied about many difficulties faced in developing countries as a whole. But in most studies of political and economic growth of developing countries the challenges faced by children and woman are not properly addressed and often deemed unnecessary aspects of research. Much evidence of gender inequality exists in society, some of the worst cases are found in developing nations. Some might wonder what these challenges are and what actions are being taken by governments and foreign aid organizations to address these matters. The difference in gender roles between men and woman have obvious economics effects and changes need to be made in order to make sure that all the …show more content…
Education: First we will begin exploring this topic by looking at the educational aspects of developing countries. We previously learned that education and schools are crucial aspects to economic growth and allow people to gain many skills needed in order facilitate growth within areas. But, in many cases woman and children are not given the opportunity to enhance their abilities for the improvement of their futures. This was either because of a lack to family resources (capital) to fund the schooling for their kids or reasons such as gender inequality. Looking at a developing country such as India, over history it is seen that women were not always allowed to go to school. Instead they were forced to stay at home and learn how to do household chores such as cleaning or cooking. This was deemed to be their education while the son of the family was sent to school. This was addressed in 2009 when the Rights to Education Act (RTE) was passed. This ensured that all children between the ages of 6 and 14 were guaranteed funding for an education by the government (Williams, 2013). Although this was a huge step towards growth and development, this did not entirely address the issue of education. Yes, it did ensure that all …show more content…
In India most families in rural areas, such as small villages, do not have healthcare and struggle to stay in good health because of the lack of access to proper medicine. Children do not have access to proper vaccination for deceases such as tuberculosis after birth and this leads to over a million deaths a year (Child, 2016). The lack of proper healthcare for children at a young age causes woman to avoid pregnancy at all cost, in fear that their child might die after birth because of malnutrition or infectious diseases. Numbers show that over 30 million women do not want to get pregnant because of this reason (Health, 2016). Although the government is addressing this issue, they are doing so with the thousands of NGOs that are starting to intervene into the healthcare system in India and providing the necessary medical treatment need in many parts of India. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has partnered with the government of India on a campaign known as the Call to Action for a TB-Free India. They strive to encourage health care providers, corporations, celebrities and others to inform people about the symptoms and the appropriate treatment needed in order to prevent TB (Health, 2016). On an overall perspective of healthcare in India, strives are being made to make it a healthier nation. With

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