The Challenges And Oppositions Of American Expansion In The United States

874 Words 4 Pages
American expansion into Indian territory came with many challenges and oppositions for the native people. More than anything, the Indians wanted to coexist with the white man in one shared country. Most of Indian culture seemed to favor peace in times of conflict. The Indians trusted the federal government, the treaties, and new U.S. policies but these were worthless in saving their lands. They were promised justice but repeatedly ended up being impacted negatively by something they perceived as positive. They were clearly taken advantage of and were completely deceived. After so many false hopes, trust was lost. Chief Joseph who led the Nez Percé claimed that he heard talk and talk from plenty of U.S. officials yet nothing was being done …show more content…
They managed to acquire land all the way to Pacific, running down several native groups. The U.S. had a pressure to expand to keep up with industrial and population growth, but had a moral and political problem in achieving this. The U.S. in this century was a brand new nation, just barely declaring freedom over an oppressive country. They battled and discussed meticulously to form the Declaration of Independence. America well knew what it was like to be ruled and practically dictated by another entity. The foundation of America’s constitution lies on liberty, equality, and the pursuit of happiness. A moral question is raised in how the citizens of America were so cruel and brutal to such native tribes than England possibly ever was to the colonies. The claim that “all men were created equal” clearly had loopholes because it did not include Native men. It was appalling to see a nation founded on liberty to act in such phony behavior. In the end, the U.S. excelled in obtaining western land, but failed in the morality issues with the natives. The balance between continental expansion and coexisting with the natives largely favored the whites. The proof was shown in the population of the natives which plundered downwards along with the reduction of their lands. The settlement of the west left natives “psychologically demoralized, culturally endangered, …show more content…
The relations never seemed to improve in the 19th century. This was evident in the constant reformation of federal Indian policy, it was parallel with the dynamics of the relationship between the two groups. There could never be a static, neutral relationship between the two if one group was superior. It was difficult for the Indians to coexist with the settlers when they could not trust them based on their background of fraudulence. Although they practiced some cooperation together at some points, it never lasted. Moreover, the two groups were completely different. They had different languages, cultures, religions, and standards of living. They had no way of understanding each other. For example, in Chief Joseph’s views, it is clear that nature was important to his tribe. He uses nature for metaphors and similes, such as the tied horse to the stake, the river that runs backwards, and the rain that washes out the bloody stains are only a few examples (15.10). While the natives admired the land, its beauty, and its resources, the settlers only wanted the land to promote industrialization. These lands once they were taken from the natives would be homes to urbanized cities, factories, or dug up for mining use. Natives saw each other “as part of an interconnected world of animals, plants, and natural elements” (Hewitt 465). Indians could not grasp the fact of private property, as “they viewed the land as the common

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