The Causes Of Tornadoes

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Introduction A tornado is known as a destructive vortex of violently rotating winds and having the appearance of a funnel-shaped cloud. Unlike hurricanes, tornadoes are very unpredictable. A Fujita scale (F-Scale) rates the intensity of a tornado. On March 18, 1925 the “Tri-State Tornado” killed 695 people and injured more than 2,000. It was recorded the top deadliest tornado in U.S. history. The tornado was rated and F5 with winds of 260 miles per hours, it traveled more than 300 miles through Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana. (CNN)
What causes a tornado to form? A tornado is more than likely to appear when there is a very bad thunderstorm. Very often, tornadoes happen when warm air and cold air meet. To be exact, warm air always come from
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For example, a hurricane is a huge storm but rarely does as much damage as a tornado would. Although hurricanes tend to have more energy, then energy that 's within a tornado can be more advanced. Tornadoes kill between 60 to 80 people and injure more than 1,000 people per year. Most common deaths from a tornado happen due to flying or falling wreckage and develop in the most berserk tornadoes. Violent tornadoes make up about two percent of all tornadoes but they rundown for 70 percent of tornado fatalities. Moreover, weak tornadoes are known to take the roofs off buildings and fracture windows. Property damage has an eloquent effect on humans because of tornado damages. In 1999, Oklahoma suffered nearly $1.1 billion in property damage and crop losses due to tornadoes. Speaking for nature, trees and plants also get effected by tornadoes, causing diseases in the soil to spread. On the bright side, biologists have been researching the possibility that tornadoes may be to blame for certain plant and animal life being spread out through some parts of the United …show more content…
Having a tornado watch justifies that tornadoes are possible in or near the watch area. Having a tornado warning also justifies that a tornado is in sight or has been observed by weather radar. If you live in a community where tornadoes are pretty common, knowing the warning system is just as important. Different communities have ways of warning residents about a tornado; many have sirens designed for outdoor warning purposes. Most families practice a fire drill at their own home, in some cases people have to practice other drills as well for a tornado. Choose the safest room in your home where everyone in the house can get to during a tornado. Make sure you are away from windows and sharp objects, most prefer a basement or a storm cellar. If you happen to be outdoors and there is a tornado on sight, search for the nearest shelter or find a sturdy, trustworthy building. But if you are not near a shelter, or building, get inside of a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest shelter or building. If you happen to start seeing flying debris while driving, quickly pull over without any hesitation and park your vehicle. The best idea is to stay in your vehicle and leave your seatbelt on, put your head down, below the windows and cover your head with your hands and a blanket if it is possible. If you are in school during a tornado, teachers and students should

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