The Causes Of The Great Migration After World War II

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After World War II, there were conflicts among the citizen and returning soldiers. Once soldiers came back from war, assimilating back into their old lives became a difficult task. Their jobs were occupied by the wave of southerners that moved to the north or California (the Great Migration). Not only did the soldiers have difficulty finding jobs but also finding houses to live in. The further you went in a city the more populated it became, while the areas surrounding cities started suburbanizing. The more populated and industrialized parts of the cities were consumed by poverty while the suburban areas displayed the opposite—wealth and prosperity. This segregation of the wealthy and poor was not just economical but also racial. Decentralization …show more content…
The Great Migration started pre-World War II, in the 1900s to the 1930s. This migration of people mostly consisted of African Americans looking for a better living, where they’d have better jobs and would not be entrapped in a cycle of abuse from southern white men. This abuse consisted of Jim Crow Laws, lynching, sharecropping, and discrimination of their civil rights. When more African Americans came to the north, racial tensions deepened. Cities were becoming even more populated and jobs could be found easily in factories. This annoyed and outraged white Americans as they did not want to coexist with African Americans. By the time World War II ended, there was another shift in the demographic, but this consisted of the whites moving out of the cities and into suburbs. This shift was only possible for the people who could afford it, thus leaving the cities filled with the poorer populations of white people and African Americans. This shift was one that was parallel to the Great Migration: the white Americans wanted to get away from a certain population and find a better place to live, just like African Americans who previously lived in the south. However, this created the decentralization of cities and lead to the suburbanization of city …show more content…
Each one of these factors had a negative impact on the African American community. It forced them into poverty stricken areas, and did not let them out, even if the families could afford it. It took enormous effort for African American families to buy houses in the suburbs. Yet, citizens also benefited from these factors, and those that did not face racial discrimination were able to move into better housing communities or have their own house. The same people benefited from Keynesianism - they were receiving more job related rights due to unions, like higher wages. Correspondingly, all of the factors mentioned led the middle class into the suburbs, decentralizing the city. However, it also pushed the lower class and African Americans further into the

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