Research Paper On Teenage Depression

1278 Words 5 Pages
Elizabeth Wurtzel once quoted “A human being can survive almost anything, as long as she sees the end in sight. But depression is so insidious, and it compounds daily, that it 's impossible to ever see the end.” Teen depression is a serious mental health problem that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest in activities. It affects how teenagers think, feel and behave, and it can cause emotional, functional and physical problems. Teen depression isn 't a weakness or something that can be overcome with willpower, it can have serious consequences and requires long-term treatment. Depression affects about 20% of adolescents by the time they become adults. It also affects more young ladies than it does males. Teens are at a …show more content…
There are simple symptoms such as complaints of pains, including headaches, excessive or inappropriate guilt, forgetting obligations, being late for classes, skipping school, and loss of interest in food or compulsive overeating that results in rapid weight loss or gain. Some of the major symptoms of teen depression such as withdrawal from friends, sadness, feeling of hopelessness, staying awake at night and sleeping during the day, sudden drop in grades, use of alcohol or drugs, and thoughts of suicide. Also, some symptoms may be a decreased interest in activities, or the inability to enjoy previously their favorite activities. Teens may become apathetic and drop out of clubs, sports, and other activities they once enjoyed. Not much seems fun anymore to the depressed teen. Some symptoms are worse than others. Another symptom may be self injury. Teens who have difficulty talking about their feelings may show their emotional tension, physical discomfort, pain and low self-esteem with self-injurious behaviors, such as cutting. Also, depending on how bad the depression is, can affect how bad the symptoms …show more content…
Risk factors for depression include childhood trauma, genetic susceptibility, and environmental stressors. Antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapy are the most effective treatments for adolescents with depression. Youth are at risk for the same effects of depression as adults but have an increased risk of behavioral activation and suicidal thoughts. Antidepressants work to decrease some of the risk, particularly in adolescents 12 years or older. Youth receiving antidepressants should be monitored closely for new-onset or worsening suicidality, particularly during the first two weeks after starting medication, and for three months of therapy. Depression in youth is common and treatable and responds best to multimodal treatment combining patient and family education, cognitive behavioral therapy, and antidepressant medication. The potential benefits of antidepressants outweigh the risks for adolescents. Family and psychotherapeutic interventions are most effective for teens. Teens with depression may not want help, but when or if they get it they can live a normal

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