HIV/AIDS: A Global Epidemic

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For the better part of the last three decades, HIV/AIDS has been a global epidemic that has robbed many people of their loved ones. Whether directly or indirectly, the pandemic has touched each of our lives and it has become increasingly urgent that new ways are developed to combat and eventually eradicate the disease.
HIV/AIDS is made up of two acronyms. HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus. As the name suggests, it is a virus which attacks blood cells killing the immune system and rendering the body susceptible to infections. Unlike most viruses, the body is unable to get rid of the HIV virus and once acquired the host patient cannot get rid of it for life. AIDS, on the other hand, stands for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and
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Everybody has experienced the effects of the virus one way or the other. At an individual level, the virus has caused a lot of pain and suffering to those infected, their families and friends. It has left children orphans and couples widows and widowers. Those infected have also had to deal with isolation from the society (social stigma) especially during the early stages whereby the population didn’t have enough knowledge on the epidemic. HIV/AIDS has created a vacuum in societies leaving behind communities with a dwindling middle-aged population especially in sub-Saharan Africa which has the largest population of infected people. This, in turn, has led to lower productivity and played a hand in festering poverty. The world economy has also been gravely affected by the AIDS pandemic. Economic growth has slowed down due to the reduction in the available human capital. Because the young population is the most affected, the virus has taken a toll on the taxable population and reduced the population of skilled laborers and professionals. Many countries, especially in Africa, have had a reduction in their gross domestic product (GDP) due to a decrease in their working population as a result of AIDS (Bell et al., …show more content…
Over the past three decades, the world has come up with new measures to try and contain the global epidemic. It is important that these efforts are increased if HIV is going to be defeated. The evolution of technology has also helped streamline this effort and create awareness especially in the media and social platforms which are popular with the most affected demography; young adults. Although currently there is no preventive vaccine or cure for HIV/AIDS however, the inception of ARV treatment has helped in improving treatment (Mamo et al., 269). Since its introduction, this form of therapy has been perfected to reduce the number of deaths and is designed to prolong the life of those infected. Nanotechnology has also been introduced to facilitate current treatment and advance new therapeutic strategies (Mamo et al., 271). To compliment this form of treatment, doctors are always coming up with better diets and lifestyles to help prolong the lives of those living with

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