The Dust Bowl In The 1930's

Superior Essays
In what once known as one of the most fertile areas of the United States, one of the Country’s most destructive agricultural disasters took place. Due to droughts and no rain, crops did not grow, leaving the soil exposed to the high winds that hit the area in the 1930s. Extending over a 150,000 square mile land and including parts of five states, Texas, Oklahoma, western Kansas, the eastern Colorado and New Mexico, the Dust Bowl was a period where more than 100 million acres of land of terrains were denied from ripe soil leaving only dry grounds and hills of dust all around. The Dust Bowl took place around the 1930s in the Great Plains due to the farmers over cultivating the land and causing soil to erode, heat waves, high winds and droughts. …show more content…
The land was uncultivatable, subsequently, the government interceded with various changes. They replanted grass and trees together with presenting agricultural methods. The roots would avoid further soil erosion. Expansive leafed harvests, for example, clover and hay create natural matter and accessible nitrogen, appropriately, they were planted furthermore in light of the fact that they retain the drive of the rain and their underlying foundations tie the soil. Additional lessons learnt from the Dust Bowl were crucial such as the significance of appropriate education for the farmers. They must be instructed to return wheat stubble and straw in the wake of reaping for organic material and anticipation against erosion. Farmers were additionally instructed to shape furrow on more extreme slants keeping in mind the end goal to keep the fast keep running off of water that would bring about erosion. Also the farmers should be taught of controlling the quantity of creatures on their property so overgrazing did not happen. These means taken by the government help the Great Plains to stay fertile at the end of the day and today the results can be seen. Such that events like the Dust Bowl never take place, farmers must be well-instructed in the standards of soil protection. The proper techniques are important for fertile soil which will increase the production of …show more content…
In an unexpected turn, the settlers who possessed the lands unavoidably were the instruments of their own downfall. Their deficiency of information and improper farming practices prompted the erosion of the Prairies on an enormous scale. Most of the soil were eroded by the wind and water, although it was the famers who permitted this to happen due to cultivating and farming methods. The circumstance was just determined after a huge exertion by the government to tackle the situation. The Dust Bowl calamity is a learning experience for ranchers and farmers as it showed the devastating effect of their improper ways for farming. All together for the issue to never emerge again, farmers must gain from the errors of the

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Solutions To Soil Erosion

    • 1329 Words
    • 5 Pages

    There is a need to systematically understand the rationality and effectiveness of these measures to enhance a broader scale of implementation. Because farmers will not use those techniques. If Conservationists push this information to farmers it should help them tremendously. Soil loss on sloping farmlands is mainly conducted through sheeting and rilling processes. Preventing the formation and development of rills affords an effective way to reduce the total amount of soil erosion.…

    • 1329 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Land degradation is a general deterioration of land, decreasing its productivity and biodiversity. The causes of land degradation include the deforestation, cropland agriculture and overgrazing and it affects up to 1/3 of the world’s people. The United States is not freed from the negative impact that overgrazing has on our soil capability to continue supporting crops and livestock. The overgrazing has impacted the semi-arid Midwestern states and ranchers know about the need to rotate livestock from site to site to conserve grass cover and soil fertility. Today, more ranchers are searching for ways to raise livestock more sustainably while taking care of the land.…

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Farmstar Case Study Case

    • 726 Words
    • 3 Pages

    By doing so, the impact on the environment was definitely improved and in addition, Farmstar provided the necessary information so that the farmer wouldn’t over-cultivate the soil. 4. Better care of the crops The product/service constantly informed the farmer what the unproductive areas of the crops were and it helped farmers identify different areas for different types of crops by using yield…

    • 726 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    GM Crops Pros And Cons

    • 1644 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires farms to maintain refuge requirements –sufficient areas of non-GM crops near GM crop fields – to slow the evolution of resistance in pest populations9. Monitoring data has confirmed that this requirement has indeed slowed the development of resistance9. European regulators could use a combination of refuge requirements and educational campaigns to ensure the public that the spread of GM crops will be carefully controlled. This will allow farmers across the continent to enjoy increased productivity, pest resistance, and stable incomes, without having to compromise their environment. Creating a unified opinion on GM crops will allow us to feed millions of people who go hungry each…

    • 1644 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Chapter 6, “When Farmers Shut Off the Machinery”, by Brian A. Devore, is about farmers who have resulted in using what they see on their own farm and to observe changes to decide what is best rather than jumping to conclusions and possibly trying to use the newest silver-bullet fix. Many different things approaches were used in the chapter. David Podoll keeps track of the weeds near his farm. Unlike most farmers who would see these weeds and spray them, Podoll keeps them as the weeds are a home for the larvae of the Painted Lady butterfly. The butterfly larvae will feed on the weeds and naturally keep the weed population in check.…

    • 1075 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If the irrigation needs have to be changed a drip irrigation system is very easy to modify and adjust to grazers and farmers. This type of system only delivers water when its needed to be given. When plant and land conditions get moist, this can help against the fight of funfal diseases to control the spread of disease. As well Many soil conservation policies, practices and other forms of educational programs have been sought to be very resourceful towards the fight against soil degradation in the United States. (Withgott, J., & Laposata, M, Fifth ed., p. 239).…

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In some instances looking on the back of labels to ensure everything is readable and understandable can assure the product is organic. Prices at other places like Farmers Markets try to ensure the consumer that the product was grown in safe soil. Safe soil is usually manure, this ensure farmers are not harming the product or the person eating it. According to The Guardian, the governments answers with the belief that organic prices cannot be lowered. This is a result of limited organic farms.…

    • 1331 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The UN is working with leading farmers in the country to bring better irrigation and planting techniques to not only make the work more efficient, but sustainable as well. Farmers are taught to not focus on a sole crop, rather a group of crops planted in the same plot of land. (New Agriculturist) This way, the nutrients taken out of the soil by one crop can be redeposited by another crop. The farmers in this poverty stricken country work the land with the mindset of future generations, yet farmers in more developed countries often do not have this…

    • 1909 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Additionally, many ranchers allowed their livestock to overgraze on the land. On the other hand, many of the farmers and ranchers didn’t realize that this was an irresponsible practice, and they had no clue about an impending drought. The decade before the Dust Bowl was also blessed with above average rainfall, and scientist believed the region was changing from a semi-arid climate to a wet climate. Nonetheless, the dust storms would increase and by 1932 there was a total of 14 “black blizzards”. The dust storms were so extreme that an estimated 300 million tons of topsoil were lost in one particular dust storm that lasted several days during May of 1934 (Coloradopreservation.org).…

    • 1306 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Sorghum And Sustainability

    • 1496 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Therefore AGRITEX is advised to provide refresher courses and workshops to extension agents to keep updated on crop improvement methods of sorghum and millets. AGRITEX should also incorporate sorghum and millets in the existing general farmer and master farmer trainings to encourage these coarse cereals intensification and crop diversification. Farmers need to be taught the advantages of majoring in a variety of crops on a farm. This can enhance the production of sorghum and millets among smallholder…

    • 1496 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays