The Causes And Effects Of Sexual Assault On College Campuses

1617 Words 6 Pages
"You took away my worth, my privacy, my energy, my time, my safety, my intimacy, my confidence, my own voice, until today” (Osborne 2016). This was the chilling statement which echoed the silenced voices of those who have been sexually assaulted on college campuses. This specific quote is from Emily Doe, the Stanford Rape Survivor who was assaulted earlier this year. Emily was able to speak out not only for herself but for the others who were unable to speak out. One in 5 women and one in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college and more than 90% of these sexual assault victims on college campuses do not report the assault (National Sexual Violence Resource Center). Was it the dress, the alcohol, the flirting or something the person …show more content…
Sexual assault on college campuses is an escalating issue. “2.8% experienced either a completed rape (1.7%) or an attempted rape (1.1%) during the six-month period in which the study was conducted. Of victims, 22.8% were victims of multiple rapes. If this data is calculated for a calendar year period, nearly 5% of college women are victimized during any given calendar year” (National Sexual Violence Resource Center). But women are not the only ones who can be sexually assaulted. “The lifetime prevalence of sexual violence other than rape (including being made to penetrate, sexual coercion, unwanted sexual contact, and non-contact unwanted sexual experiences) by any perpetrator was for men, Gay – 40.2% - Bisexual – 47.4% - Heterosexual – 20.8%” (National Center for Injury Prevention …show more content…
Many times college campuses make freshman and transfer students sit through workshops and training sessions to end sexual violence. These workshops are geared to understanding what is and isn’t consent, what a healthy relationship is and strategies for bystander intervention. But many times these programs focus on women. This is one concept that must be changed. Instead education like those previously mentioned should also be geared toward men (Campus Sexual Assault: Suggested Policies And Procedures). Many believe that this is a good practice as men are more typically seen to be perpetrators of sexual crimes, but that is not why it should be taught to them. Instead they should learn how to protect themselves from assault as well, along with how to prevent sexual assault. This mixed approach will not target men as “the bad guys” but will instead frame them with a responsibility and the knowledge to help put an end to sexual violence. Many schools are jumping on board with the education aspect of sexual assault. “Incoming students at Elon University in North Carolina, for example, must take a course online before they even reach campus that marches them through the ethics of relationships and alcohol 's effect on behavior. Orientation at Indiana University includes a musical that covers everything from negative gender stereotypes to what

Related Documents