The Catcher In The Rye Character Analysis

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he Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger explores the mind of a mentally ill teenager as the audience views the world through his eyes. Furthermore, Salinger’s novel presents a past account of events that lead up to an ending that leaves the readers mystified. Throughout the narrative, the author displays his use of irony and symbolism to hint at the true meaning of his work. First, the book begins with Holden Caulfield, a delusional seventeen-year-old, recalling his thoughts on what happens to him after he is expelled from school. After failing most of his classes, Holden decides to leave his school early before winter break starts; however, he did not tell his parents about his expulsion. Taking a train to Manhattan, Holden makes his way to a hotel where he will be staying until winter break begins. In …show more content…
The perspective of a mentally ill juvenile provides a fresh take on a coming-of-age book. Moreover, Salinger’s writing style is unique and perfectly embodies the mind of Holden Caulfield. Another strength is that the author accurately represents what a mental person acts and thinks, which books nowadays often romanticize. Although The Catcher in the Rye has many strong points, there are also weaknesses that go along with it. Without looking too deeply in the novel, it would seem like a plain, short story. Next, its ending is abrupt, leaving the readers to wonder Holden’s fate. Finally, Holden’s unreliable point of view leaves questions as to what actually happens in his series of events.
On a five-star scale, they novel rates at three stars. Although the author brings an unusual perspective to the world of books, his style can throw some readers off. People looking for action will not find it in The Catcher in the Rye, nor for anyone fond of mystery. However, the narrative provides a character who society can relate to, making it a classic in the literary

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