The Caste System In Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

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Of Caste Systems and Men For centuries people in a society have been sorted into different levels so that the most valuable people receive the best in life and the invaluable people receive close to nothing. This system of social ranking is similar to the farm in Of Mice and Men. The characters have a definite place in their own little world, and a set perception of them depending on their place. The caste system levels include The Kings, The Princes, The Workers, and The Untouchables. The book “Of Mice and Men”, illustrates how caste systems were present in the Great Depression by presenting the characters as metaphorical Kings, Princes, Workers and Untouchables. A king is a powerful figurehead who determines the law of the land and makes …show more content…
Slim is the prince of the ranch, as the Boss’ right hand man, he is right in on the action with the men in the bunkhouse, “Slim’s a jerkline skinner. Hell of a nice fella. Slim don’t need to wear no high-heeled boots on a grain team.” (Steinbeck 28). Slim is a parallel to The Boss, in his dress and his stature, but since he chooses to be with the guys he is more respected by them. George is the man who watches after Lennie because he cannot take care of himself, even when they get to the ranch George is a respected man, “Lennie, who had been watching, imitated George exactly. He pushed himself back, drew up his knees, embraced them, looked over to George to see whether he had it just right. He pulled his hat down a little more over his eyes, the way George’s hat was” (Steinbeck 5). A prince is someone that the citizens strive to be, he holds position, but minimal power and therefore is much more relatable to the public. Power does not have to corrupt. George is adored by Lennie and while he could let that go to his head and take advantage of Lennie, he does not. Slim is the most respected guy on the ranch just short of The Boss, because he cares about his team and his …show more content…
The Boss and Curley are perfect examples of the power and meanness that comes with the responsibility of a King. While Slim and George are not the princes of the ranch or are the seconds under the Boss and Curley, they are treated as such by the rest of the workers. Candy, Carlson, and Lennie are the regular run of the mill workers that live ordinary lives and will probably never amount to much. Seemingly, the only exceptions to this rule are Crooks and Curley 's

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