Case For Socialism

Superior Essays
The article to be analysed in this report is an article by Alan Maass titles ‘The Case for Socialism’ that appeared on SOCIALISTWORKER.org’s website on April 16, 2010. The author of the article Alan Mass is the editor for the previously mentioned website and also an author of a book going by a similar title. There are two mutually exclusive, opposite formal economic systems in the world that any society/country must choose. These are Socialist and Capitalist systems. The capitalist system is a market based systems with buyers and sellers. The goods and services are produced to be sold at a profit and there is little or no government interference. The market conditions determine the economic decisions and the government only enforces rules and …show more content…
Every day, every week, every month brings more evidence--hunger and poverty getting worse, jobs lost and homes in foreclosure, war and environmental destruction. And all the while, a tiny elite enjoys a life of unbelievable wealth and privilege. Something different is badly needed. But what is the alternative?” Maass reports. This thus summarizes the tone of the article as presenting an alternative to the currently existing capitalist system. The author then goes on to compare the fortunes of the rich and the poor. He argues that there exists massive inequality in the world and a lot of people languish in poverty despite there being immense wealth. Maass also reports that in 2009 793 people (number of world billionaires at the time) had a combined worth of $2.4 trillion which translates to nearly twice the gross domestic product of Sub-Saharan Africa countries as reported by World Bank. This therefore implies that 793 individuals control more money than 3 billion …show more content…
By prioritizing job creation over profits, education of society over wars and health care over weaponry we could create a more mutually beneficial society for all. Wars on the other hand does not lead to any benefit to humanity in general and only serves to increase the plight of the society. By reallocation of the money spent on wars to more mutually beneficial initiatives, the world in general would be a better place. Wars aside from depleting a country’s resources also has other detrimental effects such as increased pollution and destroying of scarce natural resources which could be preserved for the benefit of future

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