The Cambodian Genocide: The Holocaust And The Cambodian Genocide

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The Holocaust and the Cambodian Genocide both represent attempts of genocide, or the targeted extermination of an entire race or people. In the weeks and months following the end of World War II, Soviet and Allied liberators slowly uncovered the unspeakable atrocities and systemized murder that characterized the Nazis’ Final Solution plan for ridding Europe of its Jewish population once and for all. On October 24, 1945 the United Nations was established in an effort to promote diplomatic talks between countries and ensure that cruel acts against humanity should never happen again. However, despite their outline for peace, the United Nations has largely been a failure at preventing warfare and genocide in the seventy years since the end of …show more content…
Then afterwards German officers had forced thousands of Polish Jews out of their homes to then be put up in the Ghettos where thousands of Jews suffered from overpopulation, hunger, poverty, unemployment, which led up to disease such as typhus. When S.S officers would break into the Jewish homes they would demand for all of their goods and if they would refuse they would be shot which was known as “Kristallnacht” or the “night of the broken glass”. On the other hand the Cambodian government had been overthrown by the Khmer Rouge, from there it was all downhill for the Cambodians. The Khmer Rouge had forced people out of their homes to go on a journey to the countryside and if you were either unfit or unwilling to go on this journey you would be killed. In regarding both the Holocaust and the Cambodian Genocide after they were forced out of their homes they had started to lose their freedom little by little, for example in the Holocaust the Jews were ordered to wear a yellow star on their clothing, and also lost the right to go into restaurants, and also had a strict curfew. The Cambodians had started to lose their freedom when the Khmer Rouge had taken over their government, they had lost their freedom by being forced into hard labor. Also they had very little or no say in, which also applies to the Jews in the …show more content…
After the fall of the Khmer Rouge the people had suffered greatly, which resulted in many fleeing to Thailand. People on their way to Thailand had only eaten leaves, roots, and bugs along the way which resulted in many deaths of starvation. That was not the only challenge for the Cambodians they also had to avoid land mines that the Khmer Rouge built to avoid anyone from escaping. The people that did make it to Thailand had brought diseases such as; malaria, typhoid, and cholera. The Cambodians had also suffered from post-tranamic stress disorder. People estimated that 600,000 people died in the year following the fall of the Khmer

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