The Call To Duty In Virgil's The Aeneid

1459 Words 6 Pages
Within the priesthood, there is a very deep call to duty. This call is one of God, to service and sacrifice. In Virgil’s The Aeneid, duty is a recurring theme that plays a crucial role in the characters that we encounter. If a seminarian focuses in on just the protagonist and acknowledges his persistent following of his own call, one could entertain the idea that this piece is a very relevant reading for seminarians because it foreshadows the same concept of duty to God and one’s flock within the priesthood. This intimate connection is only bolstered with readings of ancient texts such as The Aeneid, precisely because of how stressed adherence to duty is within Roman culture and society. The protagonist of The Aeniad, Aeneas, frequently has …show more content…
This conflicting behavior is displayed in Aeneas’s battle with Turnus, who begs Aeneas to allow the body of his father to be returned for proper burial. Rather than ignoring his emotion of rage and allowing the body to be returned, Aeneas kills Turns ignoring his rightful plea. This flood of emotion and fraternal love for his fellow Trojan clearly overpowers his thought processes of deciding the right course of action to take concerning Turnus. If concept of duty is so important to Aeneas, could one logically conclude that he faltered in this moment of indecision and abrupt action? What happened to the benevolent, humanitarian Aeneas that saved the life of one enemy and honored the death of another? Hence, it is difficult not to conclude that Aeneas’ better sense of judgement was clouded by violent passion when he took Turnus’ life. It is clear to the reader that this is an act of a man that has lost control of his emotions. Without a doubt, Aeneas lost his sense of duty and disrespected Turnus in taking his …show more content…
His clothing clearly illustrated that he was an enemy of the Trojans, despite this Aeneas did not kill him but rather took him as his own thus showing his respect for the individual and focusing rather on duty as a soldier more than his emotions against his enemy. This all took place immediately following the end of the Trojan War, when tensions between peoples were surely high, with hatred on both sides till surging. Yet our protagonist puts aside his emotion and illustrates his true leadership

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