Bystander Effect Definition

Good Essays
The definition of ‘The Bystander Effect’ is a social psychological phenomenon that refers to cases, which individuals do not help to a victim when other people are present. The Bystander effect was present in the case of Kitty Genovese. The witnesses of this murder did not call the police nor aid her when she was screaming for help. They waited until the last minute to call the police. This very case has stupefied many people, so they have decided to do more in depth research on the bystander effect phenomenon. New information about this phenomenon has risen from the research of many psychologists. What they have found is one of the main reasons why the bystander effect happens is because of Diffusion of Responsibility, which is the sense of responsibility decrease with the more witnesses present at the situation (Psychrod). Also, another reason is because of Pluralistic Ignorance, which is if a witness sees another witness not taking the situation seriously then they will too not take the situation serious because other people don’t think it is important why should they (Psychrod).
Psychologists Darley and Latene were the first to demonstrate the bystander effect after the case
…show more content…
According to Irene the founder of Kidpower and Executive Director, the people around you might not respond because their disbelief, fear, not knowing what to do, or denial can lead to the Bystander Effect. To break through the bystander effect it is best to give loud and clear directions. For example, someone may have gotten shot and is lying down on the ground in a puddle of blood. People are just staring in awe not knowing what to do, You start yelling directions to people like “ CALL THE POLICE” or “TRY TO STOP THE BLEEDING”. After you start screaming those directions people will start to get moving and help the person and actually save the person, instead of just standing there and looking in

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    It was the same result during the murder of Katherine Genovese no one immediately went to help her because in that kind of neighborhood it wasn’t everyday someone was being murdered which caused a lot of the neighbors to not know what to do. One bystander in her case even said “It is one of the better neighborhoods. There are few reports of crimes” (Gainsberg). Social influence also plays a part in the bystander effect where bystanders look at the reaction of others to see what they will do in the situation if they see no one trying to intervene they too will not do anything and find the situation as a non-emergency (Wikipedia). Another example in Gainsberg article is when one bystander believed it was a lover’s quarrel when she and her husband saw no one trying the help the…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Bystander Analysis

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages

    People tend to not help other because they do not want to get involved, some may be afraid, or they do not have compassion or lack empathy toward the the situation or victims. Martin Gansberg was a reporter for the New York Times. He investigated and wrote an article called “Thirty-Eight Who Saw Murder Didn’t Call the Police”, about the murder case where Kitty Genovese was stalked and stabbed three times, while 38 people watched. In the article Gansberg uses a very sarcastic tone. He sarcastically calls the bystanders “good people” ,…

    • 795 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Most psychological findings are intellectual and require knowledge or thought to understand them. Due to that, I believe people are afraid of what the mind will tell us; that is why many people find it difficult or intimidating to accept psychology as a science. The unknown is fearful and not everyone can embrace progressing and understanding psychological…

    • 726 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    You can see in the facial triggers that most of the participants do not feel positive emotions thinking they are causing harm to a participant. This experiment also violated the ability to withdrawal from an investigation. The participants were able to stop, but the conductor kept telling them that they must continue in the experiment to finish. Participants felt a struggle between what they felt was morally right, and authority depicted by the conductor. They also were deceived because they were under the impression that the learner was not able to leave the study as well.…

    • 1117 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Bystander Effect Theory

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages

    One of the classic studies in social psychology that is still very relevant today is the Bystander Effect. The Bystander Effect is a psychological phenomenon in which a bystander doesn’t help someone in need of aid due to being surrounded by a group of people, and proceeds as a witness. An experiment showcasing The Bystander Effect was conducted by psychologists John Darley and Bibb Latené in 1964. The idea for the experiment came about after the public murder of Kitty Genovese. Darley and Latené made an experiment testing how subjects would react to someone in danger around a group of a people, versus being around no one.…

    • 1054 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As the torture came to a conclusion, I laid there insecure, and vulnerable to the vile world around me. Why did no one come to help, even though they witnessed the torment I suffered? Although the viewers may have wanted to help, they were immobile to rise to the occasion, wanting to protect themselves, while they were leaving me there to hurt. In Martin Gansberg's article, “Thirty-Eight Who Saw Murder and Didn’t Call the Police,” twenty-eight year old Kitty Genovese was attacked and murdered, which could have been prevented if…

    • 738 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    According to the Code of Ethics 3.1.5, psychologists should avoid deception in their work and seek adequate ethical review of public and individuals before making a decision to proceed. However, Milgram deceived the participants by not telling them the learner was a confederate and the shocking administered were unreal. Milgram also lied about the purpose of the experiment and participants had mistaken the study as for memory and learning. Although participants were simply obeying orders and had no harm from this experiment, most of the participants believed they were shocking the learners. Participants were observed sweating, stuttering and trembling, showed that they were suffered from intense emotional stress, which may cause psychological harm (Vogels 2004).…

    • 1022 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Ultimately, undermines the accuracy of the data that has been collected and analysis. There is a large number of crimes that occur but are never reported for various reasons. An excellent example of a crime that goes unreported is assaults. The reason that this crime is not reported is due to the fear that has be instilled in the victim by the perpetrators. The perpetrator may tell the victim that he is going to kill her family, and she may believe him.…

    • 830 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Would these people have picked up the phone if it had been their sister who was attacked? The answer to the question is more than likely “yes”. People have grown to not appreciate human life unless they consider a person of any value to them. A great deal of this has to do with the media constantly showing murders and people dying. People have stopped caring.…

    • 1090 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Can someone intentionally walk away from a person in distress on the street? People assume that onlookers nearby will help the distressed person by assisting or phoning emergency services. Yet, most people will not lend a helping hand. For example, in 1964, there was a bizarre crime in New York City; a young woman named Catherine Genovese, commonly called Kitty, was murdered and thirty-eight onlookers witnessed the act and yet nobody came to her assistance or phoned the emergency services. Despite several people witnessing the incident, what is the reason why nobody assisted the woman?…

    • 1061 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays