The Butterfly Effect Analysis

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By the end of his life, Shakespeare had become a master of spinning tales revolving around the complex dynamics of family life. More specifically, he was able to base an entire story off of the thoughts and opinions of the parents, or more commonly the father, about one of the main characters hopes and wishes. These shows were given an instant conflict and greater depth by staking the true interests of the children against the views of their father. This is evident in so many of his plays, whether it be comedies, histories, or tragedies, and this makes it more familiar for the reader and the audience. For instance, in Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hermia does not love Demetrius and therefore does not wish to follow her father’s inclinations and …show more content…
At the curtains open we see a very distraught and depressed Duke Orsino lamenting about the unrequited love he holds for the fair Olivia. He is so dejected that all he wishes to do is hear music and lay lazily about his house. In the next scene a shipwrecked lady named Viola speaks with a sea captain about the state in which she has landed. We learn Viola has a brother that seems to have not survived the shipwreck, and Orsino loves Olivia but she has sworn off men after the death of her father and brother. Viola decides to conceal herself as a man and attempt to gain a position in Orsino’s court. Next to enter the scene are Maria, Olivia’s servant, and Sir Toby, Olivia’s alcoholic uncle. Maria discloses that Olivia detests Sir Toby’s drinking and she reveals that the man Sir Toby decided to bring to court Olivia, Sir Andrew, is a terrible match. Sir Andrew then laments to Sir Toby because he believes he is not fit for Olivia and she will never choose him to marry, but Toby persists and restores his confidence. We next see Viola, well established as a servant in the court of Orsino under the false name of Cesario. In the hopes that his feminine looks and beauty will charm Olivia, Orsino asks Cesario to bring a message to Olivia for him. In the last scene of the act, all the unintroduced characters are brought on to ignite the …show more content…
Well, from the rest of Shakespeare’s writing, it is safe to speculate that if Olivia’s father, who subsequently was a count himself, would have wanted Olivia to marry a man of noble and worthy nature. The obvious choice then would have been Orsino. This changes the entire opening of the play. Instead of opening the scene to a sad and dejected duke, the play would possibly begin with Orsino’s return from a hunting trip or even begin with the scene following the shipwreck. This would then change the dynamic of the dialogue between Antonio, the sea captain, and Viola. We would learn of Orsino and Olivia’s plans to be married, which ultimately would not affect Viola’s desire to work in Orsino’s court, because she still needs a place to live and work. The next scene would be completely different, however, because Sir Toby would never go against his brother’s wishes. If Olivia were betrothed to Orsino by her father’s wishes, Toby would never have brought Sir Andrew in to seek Olivia’s hand. The similarities that we could imagine seeing in this scene is the fact that Olivia detests Toby’s drinking. This could also be a good point in the show to release the secret that Olivia does not want to marry Orsino, which would go back to the original architype of father versus daughter. Next we see Viola as Cesario, a well-established servant of Orsino and the trajectory of this scene, knowing Shakespeare, probably would have taken a turn. As the

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