The British Parliament: Cause, Causes Of The American Revolution

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Over the years, the British Parliament has been containing American colonists’ lifestyle. The colonies had less authority and freedom. The conflicts between the two countries were enlarging due to an numerous amount of disagreements. For many years, colonies fought for justice to gain their independence from the British Parliament. In addition, causes leading up to the Revolution, the movement of rebellion and, the new formation of the United Sates’ government led to the reasoning that the Americans had the right to go to war. Many causes were demonstrated to proceed against the colonies. Colonies were very frustrated and angry with the conflicts uprising from the British Parliament. British enforced the Stamp Act, Townshend Act, Quartering …show more content…
Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense to tell colonists the importance of a democratic system. They would have frequent elections and their citizen’s rights could be protected by a written Constitution. Thomas Paine preferred democracy over a monarchy and shared his word with others. “Although they accepted that the federal government had to be stronger, they hoped to avoid giving unlimited power to any one person or branch” (Chorlian 1). This then led to the creation of the checks and balances in the new Constitution. With the checks and balances, each one of the three branches of government can limit the powers of the others. The three branches are the legislative, executive, and the judicial branch. “Most Americans feared a strong executive branch” (Chorlian 1). Furthermore, colonists started to boycott the British Parliament. Colonies withdrew from social relations with the British as a protest. Lastly, being a part of the British Empire, was a strain to the colonies, not a …show more content…
The goal was to end up as a democratic government where individuals seek to find their life goals. “Individual self-fulfillment, unimpeded by government, would become a central element of American freedom” (Foner 191). Framers tried to enforce more potential freedom in the Articles of Confederation. The new United States feared a strong central government because of the British. The Articles of Confederation failed because Congress and the national government did not contain enough power. “The Virginia House of Burgesses was the first representative government in the American colonies” (White 4). Since there was a significant difference between population sizes, this effected voting rights. “Delegates from all over the colonies attended, and they struggled with competing concerns of large-population states and small-population states” (White 6). This led to the advancement of the Great Compromise, which created a two house legislature, consisting of a Senate and House of Representatives. The Senate had an equal representation of representatives from each state while the House of Representatives focused on the state’s population. Additionally, the Declaration of Independence was created to recognize the thirteen independent colonies as no longer part of the British Empire. “The Declaration has remained an inspiration not only to generations of Americans denied the enjoyment of their natural rights, but to colonial

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