The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind Analysis

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba invites its readers to join him on his journey from scrapping knowledge from outdated library books to attending boarding school. The first couple chapters are primarily essential to his story because they reveal all his imperfections and aspirations. He is able to show that a small change can lead to big accomplishments, which one can achieve if all dedication and hard work is put toward completing it. At the very beginning of the novel, the accomplishment that grants him all the wonderful opportunities is immediately introduced. They manifest as the symbols of hope and. As he starts to put the pieces of the puzzle together, the village is able to comprehend what he is trying to overcome. …show more content…
By emerging the readers completely, they can read the novel and fully understand his troubles and successes considering his background. When the members of the Malawi community hear of what William is trying to accomplish they call him a “misala” (190), which means mad man. Their fluent use of Malawian dialect connects the readers to William’s struggle in accomplishing his ambitions. The Kamkwamba’s constant battle with poverty and famine relates the readers to his struggle in catching a break long enough to stabilize his home …show more content…
All my life, I have expected education to be provided to me. Going to high school and college was considered the norm; it was if you didn’t attend either you were viewed differently. Waking up for school was excruciating, learning was a chore, and doing homework was my enemy growing up. However, after reading this memoir, it gave me a greater appreciation for my education and opportunities that derived from it. Watching William’s parents struggle to pay for his schooling and books reminded me of my parents. Instead of sending me to a local public school, my parents choose to send me to a private, catholic school. The schools differed in their learning quality and corresponded with our practicing religion. Although my parents did not struggle financially in sending me to a parochial school, they sacrificed money and time that could have otherwise been spent on other things. Students can take various lessons away from this memoir. The most important is the value of their education and overlooked opportunities

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