Similarities Between Macbeth And The Book Of Negroes

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Tragedy in The Book Of Negroes and Macbeth Tragedy in literature is the series of misfortunes that bring the main character to ruin. In the novel, The Book Of Negroes by Laurence Hill and the play Macbeth by William Shakespeare, the main characters respond to tragedy in many ways. One method is to remain hopeful in desperate situations. In The Book Of Negroes the main character Aminata preserves her faith in one day returning home to Africa. Macbeth has hope in becoming an exceptional king. An additional approach is the use of confidence during a calamity. Aminata remains confident in her general knowledge and uses it as a strength. Conversely, Macbeth is deceived into confidents by the witches, which leads him to his own defeat. Lastly the …show more content…
For Aminata, her confidents resides in her knowledge and uses it as a strength. Throughout out the novel, her assurance in her knowledge saves herself and others many times. For example, she lies to the men on the slave ship about Fomba’s condition to secure his life. “…but instinctively I changed his answer when I translated it for the assistant. It seemed safer to lie” (Hill 59). By observing the white men on the boat, Aminata knows that weakness means death. So she lies to the men about Fomba’s broken rip. She is confident in her knowledge by simple surveillance that she uses it to protect Fomba’s life. Aminata uses her confident to care for herself and others. On the contract, Macbeth is misled into confidence by the promises of the witches’ foretold futures. The witches show him apparitions, one of which states that he cannot be killed of one born of a women. This prediction enhances his confidence, having him disregard any fear of Macduff. “Then live Macduff: what need I fear of thee?” (IV, i, 89). This over-confidence in Macbeth leads to his ultimate defeat due to him leading his guard down and trusting the witches. Thomas Whately writes of Macbeth’s deception.
The first thought of acceding to the throne is suggested and success in the attempt is promised, to Macbeth by the witches: he is therefore represented as a man, whose natural temper would
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Macbeth is now aware of their deception, saying the witches raised and destroyed the hope he once had. “Skaeshpeare uses witches and apparitions as tempters to express the evil parts of the human mind” (Lino). Asayo Lino writes of how the witches’ trickery brought out Macbeth’s true evil, taking control of him and leading him to his carnage. It is only the realization of the witches’ tricks that end Macbeth’s tyranny. To conclude, the realization of the characters own tragedies, Aminata’s realization of never returning home and Macbeths comprehension of the witches artifices, have the characters come to terms of their misfortunes. In conclusion, Aminata and Macbeth demonstrate many different reactions towards tragedy. One reaction is remaining hope, in which Aminata hopes to return home and Macbeth hopes to become king. Another response is an amount of confidence, Aminata’s confidence is used as a strength where Macbeth’s over- confidence is his own imperfection. And lastly the two characters go through a realization. Aminata concludes she cannot return and Macbeth’s realization is when he learns of the witches’ deception. The Book Of Negroes and Macbeth are examples of how characters reaction and handle an inescapable

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