The Boiling Point 2-Hexaanol And 3-Methyl-1-Hexanone

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The boiling point of an organic compound determines its structural features and physical properties of the compound, which helps us to name the characteristics. Boiling point defined as the “temperature at which the vapour pressure of the liquid is the same as the pressure of the atmosphere on the liquid surface”. (Mahaffy, P, Bucat, B, Tasker, R, Kotz, J, Treichel, P, Weaver, G, McMurry, J 2011). The boiling point 1-hexanol, 2-hexanone, 1-pentanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol are represented in the chart above as they are approximately; 157ºC, 127.6ºC , between 137 to 139ºC and 131.1ºC respectively. The difference in the general trends of the molecules affects on the boiling point; the molecular surface area of the compound influence by the strength …show more content…
By the cause of branching the chain makes the molecule more compact, weakens the crystal lattice structure of the compound and thus drops the surface area. Hence, spreading forces reduces as there are fewer places for interaction, so decreasing the amount of energy required to break the intermolecular forces of attraction. 2-hexanone has the lowest point boiling point, as it much more branched and the third carbon has a functional group (double bond O), leading a high compacted molecule. Pentanol and hexanol molecules has the least amount of branching out of the four compounds above in the graph, and as such has the highest boiling …show more content…
It has hydrogen bonding meaning stronger intermolecular forces, has 6 carbons leading to a bigger size molecule, and has a larger surface area resulting the highest boiling point. Hexanone depicts the dipole-dipole intermolecular force which makes it weaker than the hydrogen force, and the branched chain of the hexanone makes it have a low boiling point than the 1- Hexanol. 3-methyl-1-butanol will have a boiling point lower than 1-pentanol because branched chain means smaller surface area and lower boiling

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