The Bluest Eye Context Analysis

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What blacks longed for most, beauty and acceptance, was much like the sun—unattainable. They craved to feel the bliss of the white sun rays shining down on them as they looked at it with their sensitive, blue eyes. Instead, the touch of the sun burned them if they stepped out of the shadows. Donald B. Gibson, through his writing of Text and Countertext in the Bluest Eye, stepped into the shadows that were created by racism and elaborated upon the ideas Toni Morrison introduced in The Bluest Eye. Donald B. Gibson described the purpose behind the text and countertext structure of the novel and how it served much more than simply identifying racism within The Bluest Eye. Gibson’s piece, Text and Countertext in the Bluest Eye, stood as a factual …show more content…
Gibson dived deeper than the surface and discussed how not only are blue eyes, light skin, and blonde hair what is considered beautiful by society, but he elaborated on how the idea of beauty even exists. Morrison’s point she created through Claudia’s questions of why she seemed to be the only one who wanted to shred the white doll apart, was not only to reinforce how corrupt the definition of beautiful was, but was an attempt to get her readers to dig deeper into the true meaning of Claudia’s actions. Gibson uncovered this countertext and he connected it back to the fault of the education system because beauty is not natural and is constructed by society. Whites are clearly the superior race, allowing them to have the ability to bestow upon all children biased values and ideas, which they cling to throughout life. These views society holds are largely unrealistic because genetics and economics are obstacles that stand in the way and prevent African Americans from obtaining this …show more content…
After all, Claudia and Frieda did tell Pecola that there’s a connection between babies and love. Cholly’s actions provide a different meaning because, despite his wrong-doing, he was also doing it out of love, revealing yet again, another countertext. Pecola also falls victim to the self-oppression of racism by believing she is the opposite of beautiful. At the end of The Bluest Eye, Pecola finally encompasses a quality that makes her the most beautiful being of all, so much so that others don’t look at her because they are jealous. After losing her mind, Pecola believes she has the bluest eyes. Ultimately what this leads to is an alternate ending to the novel. The blue eyes represent her insanity which stands as a countertext to Claudia and Frieda’s statement about having the ability to have a baby is a blessing. For Pecola, menstruating is the opposite of a blessing. It distorts Pecola’s idea of love and ultimately leads to her insanity. Claudia’s perspective also essentially creates another ending. The two endings of the book determine that racism cannot be escaped. Claudia and Frieda watch Pecola lose her mind, but as they do, they feel superior to her. Despite all three young girls belonging to the same race, they begin to separate their own race into classes. Gibson pointed this out and this makes readers reevaluate how they read the novel all along. Gibson tried to hint

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