The Blue Tang Fish : The Red Of The Wild And The Reef Ecosystem Will Die

1729 Words Oct 15th, 2016 7 Pages
Is it ethical to possess and continue to capture blue tangs from the wild to meet the increased demand for blue tangs partly due to the release of Finding Dory?
Melissa Whelpton, Vivian Witzke, & Serena Perras

Background
The Paracanthurus hepatus, commonly referred to as the blue tang, hippo tang, regal tang, blue surgeonfish, and Dory. The blue tang fish made its debut on the big screen in Disney’s Finding Nemo in 2003. After Finding Nemo was released, clownfish saw a 40% increase in demand as aquarium pets (Goddard, 2016). And as you can expect blue tang species is seeing the same effects after the sequel Finding Dory. With such a demand for these beautiful fish, there is a worry that since a majority of the fish are caught in the wild using harmful techniques that these fish will soon become endangered and the reef ecosystem will die (Zielinski, 2016). A team of biologists at the University of Florida have recently been able to hatch and raise the blue tang eggs. This is just a small step in a solution to the problem. These fish have not yet reached full maturity and no one else has been able to replicate this in the commercial fish industry (Watson, 2016). Is it ethical to possess and continue to capture blue tangs from the wild to meet the increased demand for blue tangs partly due to the release of Finding Dory?

Arguments For:
Research of Captive Breeding of Blue Tangs
Until recently, people who wanted to have their very own ‘Dory’ had to rely exclusively on…

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