The Benefits Of Zoos: The Importance Of Zoos

812 Words 4 Pages
Humans have an insatiable fascination with wild animals. Every year, millions of people go on safaris, board whale-watching cruises, and scuba-dive to witness the incredible undersea life all unmatched by even the most captivating documentaries. Others will take their families to their local zoo for a full day of animal gazing. Interest in animals is nothing new - from as far back as 1250 BC, ancient egyptian records describe caged birds, lions, and giraffes fascinating millions at the expense of the animals’ proliferation (Fravel). Depending on your point of view, today’s zoos are either sanctuaries of education and entertainment or unnecessary prisons. While some argue they do more harm than good, zoos have always been substantially useful …show more content…
Zoos don’t just aim to entertain but to educate as well. With a variety of programs geared toward children and adults, zoos teach people about the needs of animals and the importance of conservation. In front of most exhibits there is pertinent information regarding a species’ habitat, diet, and all other kinds of fun facts. Just walking through a zoo, you can explore a different corner of the world with every step. The thinking goes if people get excited enough they will be more inclined to donate money to conservation efforts. Zoos also provide the means for scientists to conduct research. The information they gather helps to develop new medicines and techniques to improve animal health. In 2002 alone, zoos participated in 2230 research and conservation projects in more than 80 countries …show more content…
However, zoos don’t just work to preserve the animals but their habitats as well. In modern zoos the animals will live, roam, and frolick, in environments mirroring their natural habitats. For example, take a step into Bronx Zoo’s Jungle World. You are transported to a preserved slice of the diminishing south Asian rainforest, with air temperature and humidity perfectly suited for their otters, tapirs, and about 800 other species who cohabitate just as they would naturally in the wild. Efforts extend beyond the borders of the zoo itself - the Bronx Zoo has provided more than $3 million from admission fees towards conservation projects taking place in central Africa

Related Documents