What Are The Pros And Cons Of Solar Energy

1120 Words 5 Pages
Renewable power for electricity production is a largely controversial topic in Australia, with benefits and detriments ranging environmentally, politically and financially. Producing about 23 percent of the world 's energy needs, coal-burning is a cost-efficient way for Australia to create electricity, however there are negative impacts to coal-burning, such as its harmful fumes and damaging emissions. Clean alternatives to coal-power, despite being costly, already exist and are widely used throughout the world. The key advantage of renewable energy such as, solar and wind; is that it can be obtained in essentially abundant and unlimited quantities. Australia must find the most beneficial way to produce electricity, whether it be inexpensive …show more content…
Solar photovoltaic (PV), another method of harnessing the sun’s energy into electricity, is commonly installed on rooftops and integrated into building design as it converts sunlight directly into electricity using photovoltaic cells. No matter what method, solar power, is a renewable energy source, which will never run out as long as the sun exists. Although Australia receives an average of 58 million PJ of solar radiation per year, approximately 10 000 times larger than its total energy consumption; its current use of solar energy accounts for only about 0.1 per cent of Australia 's total primary energy consumption. Solar energy is also extremely environmentally viable as it does not generally cause pollution. There are only minor emissions produced during the manufacturing, transportation and installation of solar power systems, however only minute when compared to coal-power plants. It is clear that solar energy is a viable option in reducing the nations’ inherent dependency upon non-renewable energy sources, however, its expensive cost and intermittency does raise concerns. Due to its costly nature, earlier this year the federal government’s directive to the Clean Energy Finance Corporation was to “no longer back wind energy projects … and put a stop to solar investments.” …show more content…
Moving air containing kinetic energy, or most commonly known as wind, can produce electricity by making contact with a turbine’s rotor blades. As the rotors slowly spin, kinetic energy is captured from the wind, which then drives a central supporting shaft. The main body of the turbine is located behind the spinning blades, and is called a nacelle. Inside, there is a gearbox that basically converts kinetic energy into electricity, which can then be transmitted to an electricity substation. An economic benefit that comes with wind power for Australia, is that it can revitalise rural economies by providing a new type of income to farmers as wind turbines are installed, land owners would largely profit in property tax. As a source of clean energy and alternative to coal, wind plants in Western Australia have generates about $1 million per year in property tax revenue, as Julia Gillard said in 2011, “wind power will be a vital component in reaching our renewable energy and economic targets.” However, turbines can only produce electricity only when the wind blows, there this variability may effect the efficiency of power supply for domestic users. Furthermore, wind farms can also problem to the health of neighbouring communities, as it causes a flickering effect from rotating wind turbine blades, which can in turn

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