The Benefits Of Organ Donation

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Over the years, organ transplantation has become one of the most important achievements of the health care system in the world. One organ donor can save up to 8 lives (“All About Donation”). Each year, 500,000 people in the United States are saved through organ donation. However, the waiting list for transplantation is also increasing with time. According to the U.S Department of Health & Human Services, an average of 21 people die each day from the lack of available organs for transplant. Therefore, one challenge in organ transplantation, which has remained for a long time, is to overcome the shortage of suitable organ donors. In the article “Organ Donation” in the CQ Researcher, Barbara Mantel questions whether we should pay donors to increase …show more content…
One reason why many people don’t want to donate their organs is that they are afraid their health will get worse after donating, and they won’t have enough money to cover the long term care. James Childress, a professor of ethics at the University of Virginia, states, “If I don’t want to sign a donor card for that reason, you can be damn sure I don’t want to sell my organs now for delivery in the future if the only thing standing in the way of delivery is that I’m alive” (qtd in Mantel 343). Many people are convinced that being organ donors will risk their lives in the future. That is the consequence of lacking the heath knowledge about organ transplantation. In reality, people can still live healthily with only one kidney. People who donate their bone marrow only feel tired and have trouble walking for a few days, and then they will be able to get back to their normal routines. People should understand that being an organ donor saves other people’s lives and improves the quality of health in the community. Verna Mcgeavy had to rely on a heavy regimen of oxygen when she was waiting for a lung transplant (Mantel 339). After two years, she finally had a new left lung, and she was able to be back to her normal life. She is luckier than other patients who are painfully waiting for organ …show more content…
People can be sentenced for up to five years if they use transplantable organs for money purposes. However, black-market organ trafficking exists under the law. In the article “ Organ Trafficking: An International Crime Infrequently Punished”, Susan Scutti reports that 10% of 106,879 organ transplant operations is performed with illegally harvested organs in 2010. Many patients are desperately of waiting for a transplant, so they decide to get a living organ from a black-market. “These unregulated systems can’t protect either organ donors or recipients. Therefore, the government should have an official payment program for organ donation, so they can control the organ trafficking. In the article “Should We Pay Donors to Increase The Supply of Organs For Transplantation”, Arthur J Matas suggests that the government or insurance companies provide “a fixed package of life insurance, long term health care insurance, and reimbursement for travel expense and time for out of work” for organ donors (1342). This plan can encourage people to donate their organs. The government can control the act of selling and buying human organs from

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