Immigration Reform In The US

1279 Words 6 Pages
The national debt. Ebola. Terrorists. These are only a couple of issues that the American government is currently focusing on. But a key issue in American society and economy today is the debate on whether or not to pass an immigration reform that would grant illegal aliens amnesty, or the permission to stay in the country and eventually become legal U.S. citizens. An illegal alien is a person who comes into America without a visa or permission from the government. The vast majority of immigrants come to America due to very poor economic situations in their home countries. Although many use government welfare programs such as food stamps and Medicaid without paying taxes, America’s economy and society would benefit overall if the current eleven …show more content…
For example, business owners will continue having a secure labor source. When immigrants migrate over, they take the jobs that most Americans do not want to do at such a low wage. “These types of jobs must be done, but employers consistently have trouble finding regular employees to do the work” says Messereli (1). Messereli goes on to say “A wage of five to seven dollars per hour is usually too low to induce Americans to take and stay at such jobs. However, immigrants who may be lucky to earn five dollars a day in their native countries are more than willing to work these jobs” (1). Another economic benefit would be that millions of dollars would be collected in tax revenue. Currently, according to Davidson, “undocumented workers contribute about $15 billion a year to Social Security through payroll taxes” (1). When illegal immigrants are made citizens, they will have the responsibility of paying income taxes as well. The new flush of income in the government will help it reduce its national debt and overall stabilize itself. Also, if illegal workers were granted amnesty, new jobs would be created for everyone. Beadle says “Texas, for example, would see … the creation of 193,000 new jobs if its approximately 1.6 million undocumented immigrants were legalized” (1). The creation of jobs is due to the fact that many immigrants want to start their own businesses in America. And, everyone, including natural- born …show more content…
Since illegal immigrants do not have a social security number, it is difficult to keep track of their taxes. Many believe the tax collected from immigrants will not bring in revenue due to government welfare programs that they will need such as food stamps. People against an immigration reform use different statistics to support their cause. For example, Camarota says “In 2009 (based on data collected in 2010), 57 percent of households headed by an immigrant (legal and illegal) with children (under 18) used at least one welfare program, compared to 39 percent for native households with children” (1). Also, many believe a reform will undermine the current immigration laws and those who waited for a legal visa to enter the United States. If another immigrant in another country had to wait to migrate to America legally, why should an immigrant who came here illegally get to stay too? To some, it is simply just not fair to pass an immigration reform bill. Another concern for those against a reform bill is that immigrants take jobs that could otherwise go to natural-born Americans. Since most immigrants are willing to work at such low wages, most employers prefer hiring them over American workers who will eventually demand a higher wage. And lastly, many believe that if an immigration reform bill is passed, many more immigrants will come into America. While this is

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