The Benefits Of Foreign Aid

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In 2014, 8.4 billion dollars of the foreign aid budget went directly to healthcare programs in developing countries. Of that, $6 billion went to provide treatment for and stop the spreading of HIV/Aids. UNAIDS estimates that worldwide there are 33.4 million people living with HIV, 2.7 million new infections of aids each year, and 2 million deaths from AIDS each year. (UNAIDS.org). Of those, “7 out of 10 deaths for 2008 were in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region that also has over two-thirds of adult HIV cases and over 90% of new HIV infections amongst children” (UNAIDS.org). Americas aid can stop HIV/Aids and other diseases from spreading. It is working, “over the past two years… [there has been] an eight percent reduction in mortality for children …show more content…
This sector of foreign aid may be among the most useful to our country itself. It strengthens our allies, promotes transparency and gives us the ability to shape the policies and laws of foreign countries, in our own favor. Aid can be, “used to prevent friendly governments from falling under the influence of unfriendly ones or as payment for the right to establish or use military bases on foreign soil...or to increase its diplomats’ access to foreign officials” (Britannica). The United States has to stop seeing foreign aid as a hand out, but as a …show more content…
Studies have found, “for low income countries, aid in primary education has a positive and significant effect on growth” (Asiedu). With the help of foreign aid, “literacy rates are up 33 percent worldwide in the last 25 years, and primary school enrollment has tripled in that period” (U.S. Foreign Aid). Schools built by foreign aid also provide meals for school aged children, provide vocational training, and teach societies which have been left behind modern skills like computer programing. Aid programs are creating more human capital in developing nations, more capital to help them achieve

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