The Benefits Of Being Bilingual And Being Monolingual?

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The benefits of being bilingual as opposed to being monolingual are extremely rewarding, as it provides more effective social skills, helps people’s cognitive processes to improve, and aids in becoming an effective and focused person that will do well in life. This is exhibited in psychological, social and economic situations. Being bilingual is advantageous in today 's society as it has become nearly imperative in business. Because so much of the world is now connected through finance, being bilingual is a necessity for negotiating efficiently. Another example would be missionary and other feilds similar to it. The peace corps and other international groups travel to areas that are extremely poor and that contain many people living in poverty. …show more content…
Because of this, children are more open to accept and understand that a word may have more than one meaning. Cummins, 1976 Ben-Zeev is an Israeli philosopher who wrote many books on perception and both studied and taught at the University of Haifa, making him a very reliable source. Ben-Zeev describes bilinguals advanced cognitive abilities as "Two strategies characterized the thinking patterns of the bilinguals in relation to verbal material: readiness to impute structure and readiness to reorganize. The patterns they seek are primarily linguistic, but this process also operates with visual patterns, as in their aptness at isolating the dimensions of a matrix." (Ben-Zeev). This quote goes to show that along with the knowledge of two languages comes a better ability to adapt to one 's surroundings as well as a more keen capacity to analyze and comprehend patterns …show more content…
This knowledge can serve to be benificial in the future to motivate more people to raise their children bilingual in order to increase their abilities and value. It would be propitious to raise more children in America to be bilingual because the benefits of doing so assist a more efficient lifestyle for our day and age. A way to make this happen is by requiring children to take foreign language classes in elementary and middle school, whether it be Spanish, French, Chinese, etc. Many counties in the United States require varying lengths of a language in order to graduate with a highschool diploma. This being said, beginning to learn learning a foreign language in high school isn 't the most effective method when trying to become fluent in a language. If a student refrains from learning a foreign language until they are in high school, then that student is likely to compare the new language to their first language which may lead to confusion. On the other hand, students who grow up learning a foreign language at the same time as their first language handle grammatical concepts with more fluidity because the foreign language becomes a second nature to them. By embarking on the journey to study an additional language at a younger age, the children are more apt to

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