Wounded Knee Racism

Improved Essays
During the 1890’s racism was a big deal in America. African Americans faced major racial problems and the right to be free. Native Americans faced having to move from their ancestral lands. The United States army had no justification to attack Native Americans at Wounded Knee.
During the time of the battle of Wounded Knee there were also other huge events and things happening such as congress taking Oklahoma from Indians and forcing them from their lands in the east. Battle of Little Bighorn which was a huge battle between Native American tribes and the government where we lost 236 soldiers to Sioux and Cheyenne and the Sitting Bull which ties into this battle because it deals with Sioux tribe and this event then led to the huge massacre in
…show more content…
There was a prophet named Wovoka who shared his spiritual vision and message of hope and cultural renewal for Native Americans who had suffered through decades of broken treaties, lost lands, forced relocation, physical deprivations, and death. Wovoka would preach peace but Native Americans took it as a vision to reclaim their lost lands they seen him the messiah that came to earth to prepare the Indians for their salvation . This religious movement was said that the earth would bring new soil and bury all the white men and it was said that all Indians that danced to this would be taken up into the air while the new earth was being laid down and when they were let down it would be with the ghosts of their ancestors. The Sioux tribe would wear clothing that they thought would protect them against white bullets during the spiritual dancing. During the Indian spiritual dance the United States sent in the Seventh Cavalry to disarm the the Lakota and take control. That 's when the Wounded Knee Massacre took place killing over 200 Sioux tribe members. After the huge massacre many lost hope in the so called “Ghost Dance” and didn 't believe in the spiritual dance. This was the last huge showdown between the United States army and the Indians other than the one was in 1973. It was when it was a site of a 71 day occupation by the activist group AIM and its supporters, who were …show more content…
From taking their lands and making them live on reservations that all changed when when one special person named John Collier became the U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs. He thought the policies of the past were wrong and should be changed so the Indians could live like Indians and enjoy their religion and customs of life. This was all able to happen from the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934. It allowed Indian tribes to write their own constitutions and self-governing. It allowed Indian tribes to get back 15,000 acres of their land. In the 1970’s the Indians had promoted tribal self-determination. This then brought in the act of Self-Determination and Educational Assistance of 1975 this gave certain responsibilities carried out by federal government and gave the tribes more control over education funds. Our federal courts have also helped Indian tribes in key legal situations such a situation for the Wisconsin Indians where Chicago tried to allow fishing and harvesting on their reservations but the courts didn’t allow it so the reservation was kept free from non

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    “The government had offered to buy the land, but when tribal leaders refused, they threatened to shoot any Native American not on the reservation by January 1876” (Fredriksen “Crazy”). The return threats caused a sense of unity between the Sioux tribes and the Oglala, banding them together to fight back. (Fredriksen “Crazy”). This sense of unity between the tribes was one of many events that led to the outcome of Little Bighorn for many reasons. By 1875, Sitting Bull had already gathered upwards of “4,000 Sioux, Arapaho, and Cheyenne warriors to help drive the white prospectors off their land” (Fredriksen “Sitting”).…

    • 1500 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The battle of Sand Creek was when 200 Chaynna Indians were killed after a surprise attack, changing the peace between Indians and Americans. The 1868 Treaty was disregarded when Americans took Lakota land for gold and silver in this land. Indian chiefs told their opinion on western expansion and how they felt. The buffalo almost went extinct due to western expansion when Americans tried to kill buffalo to destroy the Indians number one resource. Western expansion also affected Indians beliefs and ways of life.…

    • 364 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    An example of conflict between the two groups of inhabitants is when the tribe of Kiowas were forced to go to a reservation. They resolved to abandon the reservation and fought the white hunters who were destroying the buffalo. Unfortunately, they were overpowered. Some tribes went back to the reservation, while others hunted buffalo at Palo Duro Canyon, the last remaining range. Ultimately, the Army destroyed their village and forced the Kiowas to surrender.…

    • 719 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This was the short period of the Native’s victory. Battle of Wounded Knee - This battle was caused by the Dakota Sioux doing the “Ghost Dance” which was illegal and the fight of whether the Sioux’s land would be broken up because of the Dawes Act. It led to 200 Native American deaths…

    • 1133 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “About 20,000 Cherokees were marched westward at gunpoint on the infamous Trail of Tears. Nearly a quarter perished on the way, with the remainder left to seek survival in a completely foreign land.” (ushistory.org) Approximately 4,000 Cherokee’s died on the journey according to the library of congress website. While on the walk they died of starvation, froze, were shot, whipped, women were raped, and families were torn apart. Some tribes were even chained together when they were walking so they didn’t try to fight back. The Indian Removal act was designed to get Native Americans out of the way so they could claim the land, they didn’t care what happened to the Natives and wished they would cease to…

    • 1085 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Battle of the Little Bighorn made whites nervous about the Native Americans, so more of the army was sent in. Colonel Nelson A. Miles lead a campaign to force all Native Americans to come to government agencies. On May 6, 1877, Crazy Horse and his tribe surrendered to General Crook. In September of 1877, Crazy Horse is killed for resisting arrest, while he was taking his sick wife to see her…

    • 269 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Manifest Destiny covered in the blood of million of slain men, women, and children from various tribes that were affected by the expansion of America or sometimes in pure fear by whites who does not understand anything that is different from them. One such example was the massacre of 1782 in Gnadenhutten, Ohio, which is known as the day of shame, where an estimated 90 Christian Indians had lost their lives. They were killed by whites who thought that the Indians were raiders that had struck in Pennsylvania earlier (hmbd). Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee by Dee Brown the chapter war comes to the Cheyennes leading to the Sand Creek massacre when the Indians tried to do a peaceful surrender, yet still ended in bloodshed. On page 90 they sent out a six-year-old girl holding a white flag, but she was shot in the head only after a few steps.…

    • 1718 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    On December 29, 1890, the United States’ Seventh Cavalry surrounded a camp of Sioux Indians at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. According to eyewitness to history, Massacre at Wounded Knee, 1890, the Cavalry’s mission was to arrest the Miniconjou Lakota’s chief, Big Foot, and disarm his warriors, because of their involvement in the Ghost Dance Movement. The conflict quickly arose, as a result of the tension that had been building up between the two sides for the past few months. During a search for weapons among the Sioux people, one shot was fired, which quickly lead to a violent outburst between the U.S. Army and the Sioux. The battle, which was typically one-sided due to the dominance of the Seventh Cavalry, resulted in…

    • 1271 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Geronimo was reunited with his tribe living at the reservation at Turkey Creek and Davis was put in charge. After the death of a rebellious medicine man caused by US Military, Geronimo was outraged and escaped with many of the people on the reservation. Geronimo and his followers continued riding around the American southwest raiding villages that were settled on Apache land, killing anyone who opposes them. After Geronimo crossed the mexican border, General Crook, who no longer trusted Geronimo after he broke his promise. Soon after the negotiation, a battle broke out between the two sides and Geronimo escaped.…

    • 1035 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    An example is the Sand Creek massacre although the Chief was a peace chief and waved a white flag in form of surrender the militia still attacked, 200 women and children were killed. The camp were the massacre occurred was also a chief camp. Life was dangerous for Natives as they were treated very poorly. The western expansion had many impacts on Native Americans. They needed to adjust their culture and fight for their land.…

    • 666 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays