The Banking Concept Of Education

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In today’s society, the amount of education a person acquires defines how successful they will be in life. For example, someone who acquires an associate’s degree might not find a job as easily as someone with a doctorate in the same field. However, the way a person is taught is commonly overlooked. The way a teacher educates and treats their students greatly affects the way a person develops. A person’s experience in school shapes the way they look at the world, how they think, how they interact with others, and how they learn. In the United States, children are sent to school at five years old, graduate at eighteen, and some continue on to college. An average person in the United States will spend a large portion of their adolescents and …show more content…
The government will also create standardized tests to find out if the students have learned the required material. Whether or not the average score on these tests are passing determines if the school will get funding. This method of funding puts pressure on teachers to make sure the majority of students pass these tests, which can therefore lead to a banking concept of education (Freire). The banking system of education is essentially a teacher depositing knowledge onto their students without having them understand the concept, or memorization over understanding. A student will most likely do well on a test through memorization of facts, but they will not be able to use this knowledge at any other time. Without understanding a topic, one cannot discuss it without sounding ill-informed or be able to use it in day-to-day …show more content…
For example, a teacher who yells at students who ask questions, could make those students develop a fear of asking questions. It can be strenuous for a person to be more willing to misunderstand a subject and possibly fail a test rather than ask for help. This fear can last years or possibly forever, consequently shaping the way they interact with others. Employers will not tolerate a fear such as this; mistakes are easily made when employees don’t understand a task and they don’t ask questions. In Fahrenheit 451, Clarisse describes to Montag how the teachers at her school don’t want the students to ask questions or gain an understanding of the subjects being discussed. Due to Clarisse wanting to learn and talk to people about real life rather than what was on television, she was declared anti-social by her school counselor. She was treated like a menace to society because she wanted to think for herself instead of being told how to think, and so she left school (Bradbury). If she had been accepted by her teachers, she may not have been labeled as an outcast and her life could have been much

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