Stan Grant's Argument Against The Australian Dream

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Stan Grant. An indigenous journalist who travelled to all the nooks and corners of the world, stands up to talk about the Australian dream which was built on racism and discrimination of their people.In the article, I saw a man of Australia arguing strongly that the Australian dream is not for all. He upholds his stand by stating the obvious racism and discrimination toward the aboriginal people of Australia. A group of ethnically diverse people who were eliminated and isolated by people of their own country, labelling them as an outcast.He emphasizes on the injustice served towards the indigenous people that who have suffered and also those who are still suffering in Australia. This issue which have been an ongoing problem is killing the Australian dream as not …show more content…
The indigenous people are discriminated and not given any attention because of their skin colour and the misconception that was portrayed towards them by the British colonists as criminals and uncivilised. This misconception somehow managed to stay around even after thousands of years. Discrimination such as these causes the potential and the lifestyle of the natives to be supressed and to be buried under these issues causing the downfall of the particular society. But given the chance, a lot of them can make it towards the Australian dream. This makes me wonder, why even in a developed country such as Australia there are still issues such as racism and discrimination occurring? All the policies that has been created by the government seems to go in vain and unnoticed by the people of Australia. Therefore, this shows the awareness of people about this issues are close to none. The government should engage more intensely about increasing the awareness about this issue. The Australian dream should be available for everyone, without he exception of race, skin colour, heritage, cultural background. If this matter goes unnoticed, this can cause a part of the Australian identity to disappear into the thin

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