The Articles Of Confederation And The Constitution Analysis

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As depression struck the new nation in the mid- 1780s, new questions arose about the nature of American democracy. Many conservatives believed that the answer lay in a stronger national government. Most radicals believed it was up to the states to relieve the financial burden of the people. These sentiments fostered a movement for a new constitution. Political differences soon stimulated the creation of political parties. The main difference between the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution is that the Articles of Confederation governed the initial period after the former thirteen colonies gained independence from Britain. In that initial period, the newly independent states that formed a confederation, which means each state retained …show more content…
It solutions were ingenious and many times lofty imagination. Its foresight was great and greater than those who participated ever dreamt. But, like many great works of the human mind, it had a social explanation, it fitted together the past, present and future social forces into an enduring pattern. In social terms, the drafting and ratifying of the constitution consummated a process that has been going on since the end of the Revolution. This process may be described as one in which one group of leaders superseded another, adding its political ideas and institutions to those of its predecessors. Smaller states like Delaware and New Jersey objected to the Virginia Plan saying that the large states would easily outvote them in congress if the number of votes were based on population. After weeks of debate, William Patterson of New Jersey put forth a plan that called for three branches including a legislature with only one house where each state would have one vote. The New Jersey plan with a single house legislature and equal representation was more like congress under the …show more content…
Madison realized that a Bill of Rights was potentially dangerous if written incorrectly. He also understood that the amendments to the Constitution could only be passed either by a new Constitutional Convention or by a two-thirds vote of both houses of congress. Calling a new Constitutional Convention was impractical given the tenuous grip the Federalists had held on the first round of ratification. Madison took it upon him to draft amendments addressing specific individual freedoms and obtain approval from both the House and the Senate. This issue addressed in the Bill of Rights includes freedom of religion, press, speech, and assembly; the right to keep and bear firearms; the right to refuse to house soldiers on private property; the right to trial by jury and due process by law; protection against unreasonable searches and seizures; and protection against the cruel and unusual punishment. These subjects would be covered in the first eight of ten amendments known as the Bill of Rights. Madison used the Virginia Declaration Rights written by George Mason in 1776 as he led the development of the National Bill of

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