Summary: The Art Of Interviewing A Suspect

Great Essays
The Art of Interviewing a Suspect, Skill or Science?

Exam No. 5

Introduction
The purpose of this paper is to discuss the interview practices employed by law enforcement both domestic and foreign and to determine whether the techniques are comprised of scientific methods, skill sets or combination of both.

Definitions
Skill - [mass noun] The ability to do something well; expertise.
‘difficult work, taking great skill’ (Oxford Dictionary, 2016)
Science - 1[mass noun] The intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behaviour of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment.
‘the world of science and technology’
1. 1.1A particular area of science.
‘veterinary science’ (Oxford
…show more content…
(John E. Reid & Associates, 2016) as a way of extracting confessions from suspects , interrogators would use statements such as “He had it coming didn’t he” or even use completely fabricated information like “ I know you shot him, I’ve seen the CCTV” , using statements like these trying to elicit a response. The REID method would use a nine step approach, ending with an oral confession transformed into a written one. (compas.port.ac.uk, …show more content…
The REID method of interview can be so intense on a suspect or witness that they may end up believe some of the lies being presented to them.
One of the foundations of the REID method is that It goes against common sense for an innocent person to confess to a crime The PEACE Model.
The PEACE Model of investigative interviewing was developed in the early 90s as a collaborative effort between law enforcement and psychologists in England and Wales. This model takes a conversational, non-confrontational approach to getting information from an investigation interview subject. It was designed to reduce the number of false confessions that were being recorded due to overly aggressive interviewing tactics.
Today, the PEACE Model is being used successfully throughout the UK and other countries, and is gaining popularity in North America for its ethical approach to information gathering. (i-Sight, 2016)
The PEACE Model uses the following steps to achieve a successful interview
P- Planning. The interviewer should create a plan for the interview, that encompasses everything from key points that need to be addressed to aid the investigation, to how long the suspect will be

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