The Apology And The Story Of Bhagavad

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As we continue to research on what can be considered social justice or what can satisfy our morals, we look into the historical stories of practical philosophy. Plato 's The Apology and the story of Bhagavad-Gita are two resources that we use to discover one 's thought of choice. They are both similar because of the inner philosophical guides that shows us a path or practice to liberation of self, action, and knowledge. From Krishna to Prince Arjuna and Socrates ' daimonion, a demonstration of how similar their thoughts of doubt towards taking the path they were suggested to take and how they engaged these thoughts. Then, we can observe how they were pushed into actions by the path they took and the philosophical explanation for their actions. Finally coming to a conclusion that shows us their ultimate decision and how that decision is an example of how one is to act. The stories may differ from cultures to time periods but, they very much have similar ideas of morals.
To begin with the analyzing of how Krishna 's advice and Socrates ' daimonion are similar, I would like to start with the first reaction from Prince Arjuna and Socrates. Both men were unsure of the philosophy they have received. Socrates, who was known to questioned others (the Socratic method), even questioned his daimonion: was he really the wisest man? In the Apology, Socrates states "If you ask me what kind of wisdom, I reply, such wisdom as is attainable by man, for to that extent I am inclined to

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