The Apartheid In South Africa

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The Apartheid initially began in South Africa during the 1940’s when Dr. Daniel François Malan’s National Part dominated the United Party who wanted to unite together. After the National Party won, they had been given the Sauer report, which stated that they must choose either the Apartheid or a coalition1. They chose the Apartheid, meaning racial segregation between all races. The National party was split into 3 groups, which were white, colored, and black people. They were all formed to move to an area that was designed for their skin color only. A petty Apartheid is a form of racial segregation that only applies to public areas. There was a petty Apartheid was introduced to restrict black people from being able to live in the same buildings …show more content…
White supremacy is the belief that white people are superior to those of all other races, specifically blacks, and should have the opportunity to dominate society. In the 1950s, Apartheid laws introduced the “Group Areas Act,” where eighty-five percent of the land was given to whites. In Apartheid (1949-1994), Evans mentions, “In conjunction with the reservation of Separate Amenities Act of 1953, even black workers who during the day worked in the now residentially white only cities were still required to use different public transportation, post offices, restaurants, schools, and even separate doors, benches, and counters.”3 Blacks were given the remaining fifteen percent of the land, even though the blacks made up majority of the population. This caused areas of the society to be exceedingly crowded and uncomfortable. In South Africa, pass-laws were a system meant to segregate the black population. Before the 1950s, the pass-law legislation mostly applied to African men with obvious attempts to apply it to …show more content…
In 1942, Mandela was just twenty-four years of age when he became an important member of the African National Congress. The African National Congress as made to join all African people together for social and economic change. His primary concern was putting an end to the minority rule and apartheid in South Africa. Nelson Mandela’s impact on the world motivated many young black people to fight for what they believed in, which was predominately to be equal to the whites. According to James Nachtwey’s article Mandela’s Children, he informs the reader, “It is impossible to overestimate the reach and brutality of apartheid. Between 1948 and 1994, when the system was dismantled, the Afrikaans National Party applied hyper-segregation of races to every possible facet of

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