The Anarchic Nature Of International Relations

1599 Words 7 Pages
Whereas, Jett, in his book, “While Peacekeeping Fails”, shows that peacekeeping has remained elusive despite various efforts to contain wars and conflicts. Despite the involvement of the United Nations in numerous peacekeeping missions, the anarchic nature of international system becomes evident as the international law cannot be applied uniformly in all armed conflicts. Each conflict tends to have a number of unique factors that make it difficult to achieve permanent peace. The international organizations such as the UN lack the means to control the outcomes of a war (Jett 76). Furthermore, several internal and external factors tend to play crucial roles in fueling the conflict and the international bodies tend to be incapable of controlling …show more content…
The organizational structure of the Argentine’s military junta, its rise to power as well as the prevailing domestic oppression provides insights into the pre-war process of decision making. In the 1970s, violence caused by extremist groups had prompted army to be involved in conducting military operations to annihilate or neutralize the actions of the groups. Consequently, military junta under General George Videla overthrew the civilian government through a coup. May Argentineans welcomed the development considering the violence the country was experiencing. In the period, however, the government consolidated the judicial and legislative powers within the executive branch (Stransky 494). Also, the military regime unleashed unprecedented campaign of terror characterized with repression with disappearances, torture and killings becoming rampant (Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training para …show more content…
According to Waltz, anarchy characterize the international system and despite efforts to develop international laws that are universally accepted and international institutions that are well-established, there lacks a world government that can enforce the law. This renders international politics to be viewed as the realm of power, struggle and accommodation. Consequently, the international realm is a political realm in which nation-states have to be engaged in self-help for them to survive. In pursuing the war strategy in 1982, the Argentine government presume that the British will not strongly respond to use of force in reclaiming the Falkland Islands. Acknowledging the Anarchic international system, the Argentineans thought that British would be reluctant in implementing a self-help policy involving armed forces in an attempt to resolve the situation (Stransky 496). Consequently, the occupation was premised on the false belief that the British would give in to Argentinean occupation of the Island without using armed force to

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