Native West Research Paper

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If we were to go back to the American West in the late 1800’s, the view that a person would see is vastly different than the view a person would see in present day. In present day, the skyline would often be filled with buildings, cars, and more people than wild animals. Back in the late 1800’s, there was little buildings (if any), no cars, and wild open space filled with different type of wild animals. The west was just beginning to become settled by the Americans because the east coast was filled up and land was needed. The view of the west was in its natural state, not touched by a large group of humans yet. While the Americans were moving out west they had to adapt to the people and the animals of the west. The people moving west had encountered …show more content…
Many others became the farmers of the west instead. The first group of people that moved out west had to move with a sense of trepidation, and for good reason. As they were moving west, they stumbled upon the Plain Indians. Indians, at this point, were settled in only certain areas west of the Mississippi River. Americans had only settled east of the Mississippi River by the end of the Civil War. Most Indians were settled in Texas, Utah, and California. Indians were few and scattered on the Great Plains because it was too dry. These Indians are known as the Plain Indians. They are the large group of various tribes including the Sioux, Cheyenne, Comanche, and Blackfoot (warpaths2peacepipes.com). First off, this large group were the ones to live on the most fertile land in the west, the Plains. Secondly, the Plain Indians were also the most prominent group of Indians, at the time, to …show more content…
Wars between the whites and Indians happened often, even peaceful Indians were sometimes shot by the whites for no viable reason (Kennedy, Cohen, and Piehl; 417). The Sioux Indians also ambushed a eighty-one soldier army commanded by Captain Fetterman in 1866, killing every one of them, and mutilating the corpses (Kennedy, Cohen, and Piehl; 417). The type of mutilating most likely included scalping, which is taking the skin and hair of the head. When Colonel Custer claimed to have found gold while on a “scientific” expedition, the war between the whites and Indians escalated (Kennedy, Cohen, and Piehl; 418). The whites came and pushed Indians out of their lands, mainly to Oklahoma. When the government went against a treaty between the Indians and Americans, which claimed they would not invade their land, by giving permission for Americans to dig out gold in the black hills, the Indians had to defend their rights to their lands. Defending their land by going to “war” with the Americans. This began the Battle of Little Bighorn. The Indians resistance against the whites peaked at Custer’s last stand. This is when Colonel Cluster’s 250 men and officers were surprised attacked by over 2,500 well-armed warriors and wiped out. This ended in tragically for the Indians though, when the United States government searched for these Indians for months after with the intention of

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