Separation And Division Of Power Thematic Essay

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The founding fathers of the United States Constitution met in the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia to create a new government for the United States. They had decided to create an entirely new constitution to replace the Articles of Confederation, which were considered weak. The main purpose of the Constitution was to create a new government that would be able to sustain a state and not have too much power to do unnecessary things. The Constitution of the United States was shaped by many compromises, ideas and individuals that all wanted the same thing at the end, a functional government structure.
The creators of the Constitution wanted to create a government that was powerful enough to take care of a state, but not so powerful that it could take advantage and overuse its power. This belief created the idea of the Separation and Division of Powers. In the 17th century, the king had everything under his power, such as creating and enforcing the law. People considered this type of government a tyrannical system of government. The creators of the Constitution felt that it was necessary to include in the constitution the “separation and division of powers” or
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At first, the Constitution did not include The Bill of Rights, but Anti-Federalists feared that a strong federal government would abuse its citizens unless basic rights and liberties were provided, and that is how the Bill of Rights were created. The Bill of Rights includes similar rights as the English Bill of Rights. Both the English and American Bill of Rights protect individual liberties, and protect individuals from potential abuse of governmental power. For example, both documents state how people have freedom of speech. The United States constitutional system included ideas from the English Bill of Rights, almost as if the Bill of Rights was modeled after the English Bill of

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