The Allegory Of The Cave Philosophy Essay

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Plato is widely considered the most pivotal figure in the development of philosophy. He is from ancient Greece and is one of the most renown classical Greek philosophers. He was an idealist/ rationalist – “what could be?” Plato is also the founder of the Academy of Athens, which is believed to be the first institution of higher learning in the western world. His philosophy was interested in three areas: platonic epistemology, metaphysics, ethics. One thing that I think about when I read Plato, is the idea that one can have knowledge and not have wisdom. What I mean by that is knowledge is an awareness or an understanding of someone or something and wisdom is an actual practical application of it, wisdom is knowledge being applied. After …show more content…
Within the cave, you have cave dwellers who were born in the cave, they are chained, shackled, its dark and within their sight they can see fire, shadows and bleak amount of light at the end of the cave. In the allegory, you have a prisoner who escapes from the darkness of the cave and ascends to enlightenment (Sunlight). This newfound sunlight is blinding to the newly freed prisoner, because the prisoner is use to the cave. Anything other than the cave is scary and unfamiliar to the prisoner. Once the prisoners’ eyes adjust to the light, he realizes that the lightness is a true form of reality and not a manufactured reality which were the shadows. The sunlight represents a new reality and what the freed prisoner is experiencing is Knowledge (Education). The prisoner who departed the cave returned to spread the idea of the positivity outside the cave to the remaining cave dwellers in hopes they world venture out of the cave to a greater world outside. Not to mention the returning prisoner, who is now accustomed to the sunlight is blinded again, the same as when he went out to unfamiliar territory in the sunlight because his eyes had not yet been adjusted to the darkness of the cave. In accordance to Plato, the prisoners, would reject leaving the cave and would be firmly in …show more content…
Gyre’s ring is a thought experiment. When reading, Gyre’s ring the story makes me put myself in the situation and pose the same ethical/moral questions. What would I do in Gyre’s shoes? In the Allegory of the Ring you have a Shepherd, Gyre, who comes into possession of a ring and before the acquisition of this magical ring, Gyre is a just man by ethics and virtue. One day Gyre stumbles upon this ring on a human body, so the ring then leads him act in accordance to his inherent greed, lust, and desires and eventually making him unjust person. The ring has a specific property that makes it rather unique, that property being its power of invisibility once the ring is reversed. Once the ring is turned around, inward the one wearing it will become invisible and vice versa once the ring is turned back, outward the one wearing it would be visible again. Once Gyre had the ring he committed devious acts, such as seduction, deception, regicide, etc... Those actions were further to advance his self-interests, as he knew he was unstoppable because of his power of invisibility. The philosophical question posed is why be just, when one could get away committing injustice without recourse? The argument raised is one is diverted to justice by the force of the law. This allegory leads to the supposition that imagine there were two “magical rings” that granted invisibility, one was given to the just man and the other to the unjust man; no

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