The Allegory In George Orwell's Animal Farm

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George Orwell’s Animal Farm is perhaps the most serious and adult story about talking animals in the history of modern literature. Animal Farm is an allegory, and to some degree a criticism, of Russia’s descent into communism in the aftermath of the Russian revolution. It was written by Orwell after his experiences with communism in Spain as a warning to the people about the dangers of extreme communism and political corruption. The thinly veiled connection to the Soviet Union was necessitated by their alliance with the British Empire, Orwell’s homeland, at the time of the book’s writing during the Second World War. The story takes place in Manor Farm, a small privately owned farm in England which is populated by intelligent animals. After …show more content…
Napoleon comes to power by forcing Snowball, his primary political opponent, into exile and then declaring himself Animal Farm’s leader unopposed. Orwell uses this incident as an analogy to Stalin’s deporting Trotsky in 1929 but also as a subtle criticism. None of the animals attempt to rescue Snowball or challenge Napoleon’s leadership at any point whatsoever. This is criticism not of communism or corruption but of the bystanders who allow them to take place. As Napoleon’s rule progresses the analogies become much clearer. Another pig, Squealer, covets the animals trust like Vyacheslav Molotov’s propaganda machine; other farmers take on the role of the British Empire and Nazi Germany; there’s even a parallel to World War 2 in the form of “The battle of the Windmill”. And with every metaphor there is another criticism from Orwell, no one questioned Squealer or Molotov’s propaganda, Napoleon and Stalin allied with other tyrants, and no one was prepared for Frederick (another farmer mirroring Adolf Hitler) or Hitler’s violent betrayal. Napoleons rule is the highlight of Animal Farm and is where Orwell really drives his criticisms home with his excellent use of …show more content…
Orwell’s usage of allegories and analogies to Russia allow anyone with even a passing interest in communist Russia to instantly recognize what is going on in the story. Orwell’s narrative depicts course of events that feels completely natural, this allows readers to see how communism can progress from such a wonderful concept to a dark parody of its original concept. Some of his analogies are more subtle than others, but the main criticisms and allegories are easy to pick up. Additionally, the brevity of the book and the plain, easy-to-read writing style makes Animal Farm an appealing choice to any potential readers. It’s an enlightening experience that shows the follies and pitfalls of communism and totalitarianism without ignoring their well-intentioned origins or the reasons for their creation and eventual corruption. In short, Animal Farm is an excellent example of literature with a powerful and well-written message that lives up to every word of praise that it has

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