How Revolutionary Was The American Revolution Dbq

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During 1860-1877 there were significant changes that were marked as revolutionary. The abolition of slavery would ignite the redefinement of American citizenship, and equality. In addition, the process of American politics would undergo significant changes as the the relationship between the states and the federal government were heavily altered. However, not all of the revolutionary changes were immediate nor positive. Discrimination and segregation would plant their seeds during this time period and inaugurate an ongoing racial conflict between whites and African Americans that exists today.
The most explicit and significant revolutionary movement was the redefinition of American citizenship and equality. Prior to 1860, the Dred Scott decision
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This was a huge revolutionary movement as it was an unthinkable idea a decade ago. Soon after the Union’s victory, African Americans, to a degree, would gain an extensive amount of freedom. The ratification of the 13th amendment would officially abolish slavery. This would begin the evolution of the servitude based society portrayed by leaders like senator Morrill (Doc F) into the independent equal nation the constitution hoped for. The 14th amendment soon followed changing the definition of American citizenship. The Dred Scott decision became irrelevant and African Americans were considered citizens of America. The 15th amendment would also be ratified which restricted states from discrimination when it came to voting based on color. This was a revolutionary act in itself as the federal government would dismantle the 10th amendment and exercise an altitude of power they have never exercised before (Doc D) .Although most states found loopholes to disregard this amendment, it remained revolutionary as it manifested an ideal equal country where African Americans can vote like the one portrayed in Harper 's Weekly(Doc G). Soon after the war, African Americans were promised

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