The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Should Not Be Banned In Schools

1333 Words 6 Pages
“Once again, Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is under siege from irate parents who, focused on a word rather than the book as a whole, want it removed from the regular curriculum” (Balee 15). Balee expresses the ongoing debate whether The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn should be banned from school’s reading lists because of the explicit language and stereotypical portrayals of African Americans. This debate dates back to the 50s when desegregated schools across the nation started reading Mark Twain’s, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Soon after, public objections of requiring students to read this novel increased due to the racial epithets and racism; these objections still remain today. However this novel is more than the …show more content…
While he travels down the Mississippi with Jim, Huck encounters different characters and situations that help him come of age and grow morally as he sheds his previous, racist views on slavery that society forced onto him. This journey is a message that should be taught to students all over the nation especially to the accurate portrayal of society during the 1830s. Even though many people are against students reading this, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn should continue to be read in schools because of its literary importance, antislavery message, and positive learning experience of the time period. One important reason The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn should not be banned in schools is because this novel is considered to one of the greatest American works ever written. Before Twain …show more content…
To reiterate, this novel should be read because it is considered to be one of the greatest American novels ever to be written because it inspired future literature that focused on realism rather than romanticism. In addition, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is considered to be an anti-slavery book which condemns this wrongful practice. Ultimately, discussing Twain 's reasoning in writing The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and expanding on the literature can lead to a positive learning experience. However the final decision does not lay on the parents, teachers or students but the school board. School boards nationwide should realize that the exposure to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is paramount in a student 's understanding of an important time in United State’s history. Without this exposure, the school curriculum will gloss over a dark time where African Americans were treated as second class citizens. And depriving students from that is equivalent to skipping over issues of race that students will have to face. This is especially true in today 's day and age where racial issues are at a high with the Black Lives Matter Movement. So the efforts to keep this novel in schools will benefit each student in understanding an issue that still affects us

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