Socrates Life Vs Unjust Life Analysis

Good Essays
In this essay, I will argue the main keys to the advantage of leading a just life, which better than unjust life. In The Republic by Plato, speaks through his teacher Socrates who sets out the basic laws for humans through the longest argument among group of friends in a meeting at Polemarchus house. Socrates presents a question, “What is Justice?” He continues to disprove any answer he was given. Therefore, he present no definition of his own. Later, Thrasymachus, present himself like a wild beast asking Socrates what is just and why you go on circles and never answer the question. Then, he refers the unjust life comes with many advantages upon the just life, which that the just means nothing but a benefit interest to the stronger, the unjust …show more content…
(Plato, 22) Here Socrates prove his point by meaning, if all materials target for their only perfection, making them self-sufficient there will be no use of aspects, however, with the aspects it will find their greatest benefit. What Socrates meant, doctors and pilots they don’t do the best thing for them self as “Thrasymachus claimed about rulers” but for the sake of their people. To rephrase it, Socrates proves to Thrasymachus his understanding of ruler is wrong because rulers should worry about their people not themselves. Socrates continues to point out Thrasymachus idea about injustice is more profitable, and strong men have the courage to break the rules; they can take advantage of the weak and justice is differed. (Plato, 31) Further, Socrates confirms the group that Thrasymachus is wrong on three points; one, that the unjust man is superior to the just man with knowledge, second, the injustice is strength, and third injustice brings happiness. (Plato, 32) Another analogy Socrates had to point out to respond to this challenge, a musician versus unmusical. He said, the ignorant man always try …show more content…
Glaucon and Adeimantus were not convinced with Socrates explanation and they outlined three classes of what good could possible be. First class, a good that everyone wants for their own benefits. Second class, some things people value for their own sake and for their both knowledge and healthy living. And third class, good that everyone benefit from like, medical treatment, physical training, and wages for work. Then, Glaucon ask which category justice belong from these classes? (Plato, 42) Socrates begins to clarify the argument to the brothers, by stating, consequently we are nearsighted to find justice in the individual rather looking for it at large scale. Socrates instruct them to look at the subject at large in the ideal. He led them to scenario of ideal just state. Socrates took the historical development of an actual state, he took the type of state where he lived. The Greek city-state. To demonstrate, let people unite to shape of community because of the mutual needs; food, residence, farms and farming, education, and go on. Moreover, each human is born with both different talents and abilities, then they should be assigned to different level of occupations to ensure the common good and stability of the country. He continued describing the image of a perfect society by adding: Some people should be farmers, some tailors, carpenter,

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Or is better to say that Justice is indefinable and unsolvable, and that is beyond human understanding? Plato and Socrates imparted their noble wisdom so that we were better off in life. If they would be still around, they would be disillusioned to see our state of deterioration. They endeavored us to be in harmony with our souls. Indeed, things, people, and ideas have changed, except…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Socrates’ most palpable reasoning for this principle is that the many found him guilty even though he thinks he’s innocent. The judgement of the many is degraded in Socrates’ mind after they convict him. Another motive for Socrates to dismiss the opinion of the many is because he likes to consult experts. Socrates believes that no one should claim knowledge over anything that they are not experts on. This is seen in Plato’s Symposium when Socrates says “how ridiculous I’d been to agree to join you in praising Love and to say that I was a master of the art of love, when I knew nothing whatever of this business, of how anything whatever ought to be praised” (Sym.…

    • 1420 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Polemarchus, Cephalus’ son, tells Socrates that Cephalus’ definition of justice was correct just as Simonides also states. Cephalus leaves and Socrates asks Polemarchus to interpret what Simonides definition of justice is. Polemarchus simply states that Simonides believes that justice is when you give back what you’ve taken from someone. Socrates acknowledges that Simonides is a smart man, but he still does not understand his reasoning. For Socrates knows that Simonides would not agree that a crazy man should be given his weapon back simply because the weapon belong to the man.…

    • 1313 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This justification is hard to believe for some readers considering that he argued against the existence of definite definitions of just and unjust and a professional in knowledge of all their features so profusely in “Euthyphro”. Additionally, by his demise, the world would be void of his philosophical contributions that he has convinced himself he should be remunerated for. Of itself, this outcome would be unjust. Socrates sustains this rationale, nevertheless. He gives “… that the really important thing is not to live but to live well”; also, “…to live well amounts to the same thing as to live honourably and justly” (Plato, 2003, p. 87).…

    • 1318 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Cave Vs Plato

    • 716 Words
    • 3 Pages

    I felt Socrates is very dominant in his assertions, smug even. A philosopher caught up in judging his fellow man because they could not see what he saw. Nonetheless, I feel his assertions to be true, Man can become a prisoner of his perception or led astray through manipulation or hurt by deceit. Socrates makes us aware of how there are two worlds co-existing in the human mind, the material and immaterial (thoughts, emotions, etc). And how he preferred to dive deeper into the rabbit hole, despite finding only more…

    • 716 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    42a). This final statement is ironic because it is clear which of these is the better thing in Socrates case; as a result of living an examined life, and because the “unexamined life is not worth living for a human being,” Socrates has lived his life to the fullest extent by being a paradigm of virtue for the men of Athens in a society that does not want to hear the truth (Apo.…

    • 764 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Socrates Reflection

    • 1813 Words
    • 8 Pages

    the unexamined life is not worth living for man?” is Socrates asking the jury if someone 's life does not leave something behind for others, is it even worth living? He believed for a life to be fulfilled, the individual had to leave something behind for others to grasp and carry on for generations. The thing that Socrates wanted to leave behind was his wit and views. He goal was to leave a mark or impression on others so they do not forget who he was. The quote sums up why Socrates was not upset or sadden by the fact he is going to be killed for his teachings.…

    • 1813 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    While Callicles’s diatribe on the strong and the weak displays a range of rhetorical power, Socrates exposes its many faulty assumptions and self-contradictions. First, Socrates points out that under Callicles’s definition of strength and superiority, the masses must be stronger and superior to individuals and thus laws passed democratically must meet Callicles’s criteria for strength. This conflicts with Callicle’s contempt for the weak masses and the rules they create. However, Callicles retreats by claiming he misspoke and that he rather means that “the elite” are the superior and “a single individual” can be “superior to ten thousand others” (75). Through the dialectical method, Socrates leads Callicles assert that the tyrant is the strongest of all, the most elite and thus the happiest.…

    • 1263 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    After which, he tries to leave, but is stopped by the others that are listening to the conversation. Socrates says that “...nonetheless, he does not persuade me that injustice is more profitable than justice (345a6).” The son of Cephalus, again, becomes upset and basically asks “Do I have to force feed you my argument for it to be convincing? (345b3-4)” After which, Socrates asks is rulers rule willingly (345e). Thrasymachus does not think it, rather he knows it (345e3). Again, Socrates pulls the crafts into his questioning to make sure Thrasymachus can see his point.…

    • 1375 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Glaucon supports his theory out of his analogy of the Rings of Gyges where those who practiced justice only did so out of fear and as soon as the barrier was lifted, they started to commit bad deeds. Acting justly simply makes their lives more secure and convenient rather than their spirits aligning with reason. Glaucon concludes his argument by adding a statement by Adeimantus who claims that justice is praised only for its consequences, it holds a reputation with winning, such as within political campaigns or successful marriages. Ultimately, both philosophers challenge Socrates to prove whether or not justice can be justified as a good in…

    • 1319 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays