The Influence Of Martin Luther's Role In The Protestant Reformation

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Martin Luther remains as one of the most influential yet controversial individuals in history. His involvement in the Protestant Reformation changed the course of both Christian and European history for the better. Unlike those of his time, Luther was rather forward thinking, and was willing to challenge the church in order to accomplish what he believed was right. His actions and ideas led to a great deal of disagreement, yet ultimately brought into question unjust action being taken by the church. The actions of Martin Luther were revolutionary for his time, and the starting of the Protestant Reformation influenced European history for centuries to come. Luther’s childhood and education allowed for him to become an influential thinker and leader. Born November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, he soon moved to Mansfeld and began his education (Hillerbrand). He later attended a school in Magdeburg, whose emphasis on personal piety, “exerted a lasting influence on him,” (Hillerbrand). While studying at the University of Erfurt, Luther received a Master of Arts Degree in …show more content…
While he was not aiming to reform, and rather to question the Church, his actions resulted in the want for reform. His actions ultimately sparked the Protestant Reformation, which made religion more accessible to those in the lower classes. With his writing of the Bible in German, along with his defiance of the Church, the creation of Lutheranism was created. This created a subsect of not only Protestantism, but the Roman Catholic Church itself. Luther acted as a great reformer, and drastically changed the religious landscape for centuries to come. Therefore, Luther can be viewed as one of the greatest reformers in history, as he set the landscape for future reform. Additionally, he is one of the most notable instances of defiance of the Church, which sets the scene for greater defiance of the Church, along with other aspects of

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