True Love In Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

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“The act of love is largely the art of persistence,” said Albert Ellis. This concept could be brought into Shakespeare’s comedy, Twelfth Night, where the character Orsino was madly in love with the character Olivia; however, after learning that Olivia had already married Sebastian, Orsino transfers his love to Sebastian's sister, Viola, and marries her. Very similarly, although Olivia was in love with Cesario (Viola) she also then transfers her love to Sebastian after she had realized that she had married Sebastian instead of Cesario. The play does not end with a real komos moment for both Olivia and Orsino does not truly love their newlywed partner. Olivia demonstrates her deficient love due to her imperfected personality towards Sebastian …show more content…
As Sebastian and Viola reveals their real identity, Sebastian tells Olivia, “So comes it, lady, you have been mistook. / But nature to her bias drew in that…. Nor are you therein, by my deceived: / You are betrothed both a maid and man” (5.1.271-75). After hearing Sebastian and Orsino’s words about Sebastian's nobility, Olivia does not question any further and “happily” marries Sebastian. Olivia demonstrates how carefree she is when she easily accepts the fact that she had been in love with a lady, and quickly move on to love another person, Sebastian. Olivia’s mindless acceptability her quick transfer of love forms the base of insecure love with Sebastian. Their undetermined love proves the komos moment of Twelfth Night to be a defective one. In addition, throughout the play, Olivia also proves herself to be extremely unobservant and self-centered. She even married Sebastian under the expectation that he was Cesario, “What time we will our celebration keep / …show more content…
In the play, Orsino reveals himself to be dangerous to be around with. Reaching the end of the story, after Orsino sees that Olivia loves Cesario instead of him, he actively threatens Viola’s life, “Him will I tear out of that cruel eye / Where he sits crowned in his master's spite. / Come, boy, with me; my thoughts are ripe in mischief: / I'll sacrifice the lamb that I do love / To spite a raven's heart within a dove” (5.1.129-34). Orsino would sacrifice anything that he likes for his loved one, as in this case, Olivia acts as Orsino’s very loved one and only out of jealousy, Orsino attempts to sacrifice his favorite servant. Viola faces the peril of death next to Orsino; therefore, naturally, the play would have a flawed komos moment when one of the main characters is treacherous to be around with. In addition to being perilous, Orsino also exemplifies himself to truly love Viola. In the encounter with Olivia, Orsino first establishes his mad love towards Oliva, “Here comes the countess: now heaven walks on earth. / But for thee, fellow; fellow, thy words are madness” (5.1.96-97); however, just a while later, Orsino then proposes to Viola after he sees that Olivia had already married Sebastian, “Here is my hand: you shall from this time be / Your master's mistress” (5.1.343-44). There

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